soloistic

so·lo·ist

 (sō′lō-ĭst)
n.
One who performs a solo.

so′lo·is′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

soloistic

(ˌsəʊləʊˈɪstɪk)
adj
(Music, other) relating to soloists or solo parts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Pianos melded into the general array with tact and discretion to soloistic bombast.
(67) The accompanying instruments play continuously repeating rhythms while a low-pitched drum, acting as a master drum or leader, plays a changing rhythm in an improvised soloistic fashion.
Musgrave's Night Music (1969) was a BBC commission; in it, the two horns are featured in a soloistic and dramatic way.
From among those three, but also among the other forty six commercial recordings made between 1937 and 201 7, the Jerusalem Quartet's production will captivate with its rich sound, the contrasting tempi and dynamics, pointed agogics, and the almost soloistic first viola part in the scherzo trio.
So it's a very soloistic album because everyone can hear everyone else's voice very clearly.
As pitch and sound requirements became more standardized throughout Europe--and the use of the bassoon in orchestras became more soloistic and wider in tonal and stylistic range--players needed reeds with greater flexibility of tone and expression.
The violin part, while beautiful, is not challenging, and does not emerge wholly as soloistic until the final song.
Shostakovich's revision of the B section thus made its statement more orchestral and less soloistic, as well as more linear and expressively consistent.
Representative of this soloistic scoring was the 2nd movement, entitled Game of Pairs.
Michalek's clever use of stylistic features borrowed from the Noh theatre tradition matched up with Davis' imaginative and programmatic palette of live sounds, both accompanimental and soloistic, generated the tricky energy flow needed to animate an essentially slow-motion visual life.
As he explains, the soloistic character of much Inuit music enables singers to incorporate subtle, yet complex rhythmic variations and vocal ornaments into their performances.
"Big, massed orchestral sounds, alternating with very nuanced, soloistic use of strings and winds.