solvolysis


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sol·vol·y·sis

 (sŏl-vŏl′ĭ-sĭs, sôl-)
n.
A chemical reaction in which the solute and solvent react to form a new compound.


sol′vo·lyt′ic (-və-lĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

solvolysis

(sɒlˈvɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Chemistry) a chemical reaction occurring between a dissolved substance and its solvent. See also hydrolysis
[from solv(ent) + -lysis]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
solvolyse
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, these polyamic acid precursors are vulnerable to hydrolysis or solvolysis and the imidization ring closing reaction releases water, which can lead to delamination from volume change and may hydrolyze the polyamic acid intermediate [20, 21], Such an approach also limits Pis to being cast as thin sheets with little post-synthetic processability for industrial applications.
Various technologies focused much effort in this way: solvolysis [12], pyrolysis [13], and steam thermolysis [14].
Lai, "Preparation of high crystallinity cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by ionic liquid solvolysis," Biomass & Bioenergy, vol.
Wells, "Kinetics of solvolysis of the transdichlorotetrapyridinecobalt( III) ion in water and in water + methanol," Journal of the Chemical Society, Dalton Transactions, vol.
Mistry, "The effect of ultrasound on the solvolysis of 2-chloro-2-methylpropane in aqueous alcoholic media," Tetrahedron Letters, vol.
(69.) Mok, W.S.L., and Antal Jr., M.J., Uncatalyzed solvolysis of whole biomass hemicellulose by hot compressed liquid water.
Changes in the interunit linkage types during solvolysis were investigated.
" Composites are very difficult to recycle and the team at the University of Birmingham has developed a process called solvolysis to illustrate that composites can be recycled and used in manufacturing processes with industry.
Composites are very difficult to recycle but the team at the University of Birmingham has developed a new technique using a process called solvolysis.
Professor Leeke and his team developed a technique using a process known as solvolysis to recycle composite materials, a process that is notoriously difficult.