somatology

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so·ma·tol·o·gy

 (sō′mə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The physiological and anatomical study of the body.

so′ma·to·log′ic (sō′mə-tl-ŏj′ĭk, sō-măt′l-), so′ma·to·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ma·tol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

somatology

(ˌsəʊməˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Biology) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
2. (Anatomy) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
3. (Physiology) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology dealing with the physical characteristics of man
somatologic, ˌsomatoˈlogical adj
ˌsomatoˈlogically adv
ˌsomaˈtologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phys′ical anthropol′ogy


n.
the branch of anthropology dealing with the evolutionary changes in human body structure and the classification of modern races, using mensurational and descriptive techniques. Also called biological anthropology. Compare cultural anthropology.
[1870–75]
phys′ical anthropol′ogist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

somatology

Obsolete, the branch of physics that studies the properties of matter. Also called somatics.
See also: Matter
physical anthropology.
See also: Anthropology
the branch of anthropology that studies man’s physical characteristics. Also physical anthropology, somatics.somatologie, somatological, adj.
See also: Body, Human
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
By creating a system which marked off those with lighter complexions in the north from those with darker complexions in the south, Ripley hoped to distinguish between Europeans whose Aryan ancestors migrated from Asia and those whose roots lay in Africa, a distinction Ripley called "the main problem for the somatologist." In this schema, Jewish origins were located on the African continent, and Jews were characterized by their "full and sensual" lips, swarthy complexion, and dark hair and eyes, traits usually ascribed to African Americans.