somatology


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

so·ma·tol·o·gy

 (sō′mə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The physiological and anatomical study of the body.

so′ma·to·log′ic (sō′mə-tl-ŏj′ĭk, sō-măt′l-), so′ma·to·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ma·tol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

somatology

(ˌsəʊməˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Biology) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
2. (Anatomy) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
3. (Physiology) the branch of biology concerned with the structure and function of the body
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology dealing with the physical characteristics of man
somatologic, ˌsomatoˈlogical adj
ˌsomatoˈlogically adv
ˌsomaˈtologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phys′ical anthropol′ogy


n.
the branch of anthropology dealing with the evolutionary changes in human body structure and the classification of modern races, using mensurational and descriptive techniques. Also called biological anthropology. Compare cultural anthropology.
[1870–75]
phys′ical anthropol′ogist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

somatology

Obsolete, the branch of physics that studies the properties of matter. Also called somatics.
See also: Matter
physical anthropology.
See also: Anthropology
the branch of anthropology that studies man’s physical characteristics. Also physical anthropology, somatics.somatologie, somatological, adj.
See also: Body, Human
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Who would not sympathise with a woman who is punished for producing a daughter, not a son, when the little somatology that I know suggests that it is the man who is more responsible for the sex of his child than his wife?
Gjessing, Contribution to the Somatology of Periodic Catatonia, Pergamon Press, New York, NY, USA, 1974.
Today it all seems more complicated, largely as a result of new fossil discoveries, as well as the findings of ethology and somatology. It has recently been suggested, for example, that language emerged from a wordless but not soundless ritual, like Eliot's, "The word within a word, unable to speak a word/Swaddled in darkness." Alan Lomax, from the study of ethnic music, concluded that song is "danced speech." Bess Hawes found that the underlying principle in the songs of the Sea Islander is the unheard beat--like an orchestra in which nobody plays the tune because everybody hears it.