songster


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song·ster

 (sông′stər, sŏng′-)
n.
1.
a. One who sings.
2. A songbird.

songster

(ˈsɒŋstə)
n
1. (Music, other) Also (fem): songstress a singer or poet
2. (Poetry) Also (fem): songstress a singer or poet
3. (Animals) a singing bird; songbird

song•ster

(ˈsɔŋ stər, ˈsɒŋ-)

n.
1. a person who sings; a singer.
2. a writer of songs or poems; a poet.
3. a songbird.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English sangestre songstress. See song, -ster]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.songster - a composer of words or music for popular songssongster - a composer of words or music for popular songs
composer - someone who composes music as a profession
2.songster - a person who sings
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
songstress - a woman songster (especially of popular songs)
3.songster - any bird having a musical callsongster - any bird having a musical call  
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus

songster

noun
A person who sings:
Translations
dalnokénekes

songster

[ˈsɒŋstəʳ] N (= singer) → cantante m; (= bird) → pájaro m cantor

songster

nSänger m
References in classic literature ?
Nor, at the time, had it failed to enter his monomaniac mind, that all the anguish of that then present suffering was but the direct issue of a former woe; and he too plainly seemed to see, that as the most poisonous reptile of the marsh perpetuates his kind as inevitably as the sweetest songster of the grove; so, equally with every felicity, all miserable events do naturally beget their like.
The young man replied that he was the musician and songster of the night before.
The poor fellow appeared relieved from a state of great embarrassment; for, pursuing the direction of the voice--a task that to him was not much less arduous that it would have been to have gone up in the face of a battery--he soon discovered the hidden songster.
Surely," answered Allan readily; for he was no third-rate songster that must be asked again and again, but said "yes" or "no" at the first bidding; so, taking up his harp, he ran his fingers lightly over the sweetly sounding strings, and all was hushed about the cloth.
There was the honest cockrobin, the favorite game of stripling sportsmen, with its loud querulous note; and the twittering blackbirds flying in sable clouds, and the golden- winged woodpecker with his crimson crest, his broad black gorget, and splendid plumage; and the cedar-bird, with its red tipt wings and yellow-tipt tail and its little monteiro cap of feathers; and the blue jay, that noisy coxcomb, in his gay light blue coat and white underclothes, screaming and chattering, nodding and bobbing and bowing, and pretending to be on good terms with every songster of the grove.
As they turned into the avenue leading to the house, a whole choir of feathered songsters fluted a sudden torrent of melodious greeting from their leafy hiding places.
She soon found that whistling to the bullfinches in Mrs d'Urberville's room was no such onerous business when she had regained the art, for she had caught from her musical mother numerous airs that suited those songsters admirably.
She could climb a tree to rob the nests of the feathered songsters of their speckled spoils.
We behold the face of nature bright with gladness, we often see superabundance of food; we do not see, or we forget, that the birds which are idly singing round us mostly live on insects or seeds, and are thus constantly destroying life; or we forget how largely these songsters, or their eggs, or their nestlings, are destroyed by birds and beasts of prey; we do not always bear in mind, that though food may be now superabundant, it is not so at all seasons of each recurring year.
I was not only nearer to some of those which commonly frequent the garden and the orchard, but to those smaller and more thrilling songsters of the forest which never, or rarely, serenade a villager -- the wood thrush, the veery, the scarlet tanager, the field sparrow, the whip-poor-will, and many others.
Saltburn was the venue in the early 1960s for a Tyne-Tees broadcast featuring members of Middlesbrough Citadel Salvation Army band and Sherburn Hill Songster Brigade.
The songster brought the beats from his latest album "180 Degrees" to the Conference Hall in Paris where a host of locals and internationals showed up to hear their beloved musician perform.