soniferous

soniferous

(sɒˈnɪfərəs)
adj
(General Physics) carrying or producing sound
References in periodicals archive ?
Localizing individual soniferous fish using passive acoustic monitoring.
The records are impressed on a subtle substance called akasha (or Soniferous Ether).
Charles Stankievech: The Soniferous AEther of the Land Beyond The Land Beyond
Stankievech's new film and sound installation, The Soniferous 'Ether of the Land Beyond, will be presented by the National Arts Centre in Ottawa until June 2.
These recording systems, along with signal processing algorithms, now represent the most practical method available to collect long-term, high-resolution data on spawning behavior of soniferous fishes, many of which include commercially and recreationally managed species (i.e., drums and groupers [families Sciaenidae and Serranidae, respectively]).
The gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) was the only other soniferous fish recorded.
Schafer warned sound-artists, composers, installation-artists, planners and architects of their responsibilities toward the Nature of this global soundscape: 'If synthetic sounds are introduced, if we venture to produce what I would call "the soniferous garden", care must be taken to ensure that they are sympathetic vibrations of the garden's original notes ...
I have changed the meaning of Virgil's line." The soniferous and rhythmic effects of tendebantque and ulterioris amore are not superfluous adornments.
Language ,as a music, inchoate at the start, intended to be heard as music is heard, evolves into ever soniferous realms of language/music utterances, worlds and modes of linguistic expression and expressiveness, worlds of soundsense, of intense inquiry: "to be: is: to mean." In his own voice at the close, Ben's sound--in a here-space--is just barely there.
Spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), like most other members of the family Sciaenidae (drums), are soniferous and produce a variety of sounds with specialized musculature associated with the swim bladder.
Passive acoustics has the potential to be an inexpensive means of identifying spatial and temporal trends in abundance for soniferous fish species.
We also compared our field recordings to published descriptions of calls of all other known soniferous species encountered in the estuary (e.g., Fish and Mowbray, 1970; Mok and Gilmore, 1983; Sprague and Luczkovich, 2001).