sonoluminescence


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son·o·lu·mi·nes·cence

 (sŏn′ə-lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
The production of light as a result of the passing of sound waves through a liquid medium. The sound waves cause the formation of bubbles that emit bright flashes of light when they collapse.

sonoluminescence

(ˌsəʊnəʊˌluːmɪˈnɛsəns)
n
(General Physics) luminescence produced by ultrasound
References in periodicals archive ?
Crum, "Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry, and sonophysics," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol.
Lindau, Acoustic cavitation, bubble dynamics and sonoluminescence, Ultrasonics--Sonochemistry 14 (2007) 484-491.
A considerable amount of credit should be given to Tom Brennan of West Virginia Wesleyan College for his work on sonoluminescence, which provides the empirical support for the unified theory in physics.
"There are several documented and currently taught laboratory experiments that accurately portray the events in Genesis in sequential order, the most important being that of sonoluminescence," he wrote.
The shorter duration and higher frequency of diagnostic ultrasound make bubble formation less likely than with the ultrasound used in sonoluminescence experiments.
These mechanisms include, but are not limited to, such phenomena as sonoluminescence (the emission of light due to the implosion of small bubbles) and crystallo- and triboluminescence (the emission of light due to the crystallization and fracturing of crystals, respectively).
with thermoacoustics and sonoluminescence, according to other experts in the
V Prevenslik, "Acoustoluminescence and sonoluminescence," Journal of Luminescence, vol.
Researchers have long known that the collapse of ultrasonically generated bubbles emits flashes of light--a phenomenon called sonoluminescence (SN: 3/6/04, p.
Modern-day "take-off" followed the development of plastics, bullet-proof Kevlar, ceramic engineering, high-strength alloys, composites, silicon, super-alloys, fullerenes, high-temperature superconductors, sonoluminescence, superfluidity, crystallography, semiconductors, cryogenics, time/temperature/pressure-variable materials, nanotechnologies, antimatter, "bio-factories," and designer materials of every sort imaginable.