sooty mold


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Related to sooty mold: Mealybugs

sooty mold

n.
1. A blackish fungal growth that develops on plant surfaces that have become covered with honeydew secreted by aphids or other insects.
2. Any of the ascomycetous fungi that produce such growth.

soot′y mold′


n.
1. a disease of plants caused by a dark fungus that grows on the honeydew secretions of certain insects.
2. any fungus causing this disease.
[1900–05]
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References in periodicals archive ?
'This is the reason that the white gold is under severe attack of the whitefly, thrips and pink bollworm and is turning into black due to subsequent development of sooty mold on affected leaves.
Black, sooty mold is a fungus that grows on the honeydew.
* Massive honeydew build-up under plants, sometimes with black sooty mold.
The goals are to determine the feeding damage to the vine, long-term damage, amount of yield reduction and the impact of sooty mold (which can occur on the honeydew secreted by the insects as they feed) on the vines.
They tend to be prone to sooty mold, scale insect and woolly aphid.
Mahogany seedlings showed deformation of the stem and the apical bud and the presence of sooty mold fungi due to the large amount of honeydew excreted by the insect (Fig.
Whiteflies also produce large amounts of sticky, sugary honeydew, which in turn is colonized by black sooty mold, reducing the attractiveness and marketability of whitefly-infested crops.
It also causes indirect damage by its excretion, which favors the development of sooty mold (Capnodium sp.) that completely coats the leaf, resulting in reduction of photosynthesis and impairing plant respiration (Oliveira et al., 2001).
These pests produce sticky secretions called "honeydew" that drip from the leaves, appearing as though your crape myrtle is "crying." These secretions stimulate the growth of sooty mold, an unsightly black coating on leaves.
Additionally a visual percentage of leaf canopy coverage by the sooty mold fungus caused by Capnodium sp.
This sticky substance is a medium for the growth of sooty mold fungi and can attract ants, flies and other insects.