sooty mould


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Related to sooty mould: powdery mildew, sooty mold

sooty mould

n
1. (Plant Pathology) a fungal plant disease characterized by a blackish growth covering the surface of leaves, fruits, etc
2. (Plant Pathology) any of various fungi, such as species of Meliola or Capnodium, that cause this disease
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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I would be grateful for A The black sooty mould on the leaves is a common problem with camellias but usually doesn't harm the shrub fatally - you did the right thing by washing it off.
Jo Gorman South Ealing, Greater London Hi Jo The black sooty mould on the leaves is a common problem with camellias but usually doesn't harm the shrub fatally - you did the right thing by washing it off.
SOOTY MOULD Symptoms: Dusty black, sticky fungus that covers leaves, stems and branches.
If there are plants underneath, they tend to get a sooty mould growing on the honeydew.
If there are plants underneath they tend to get a sooty mould growing on the honeydew.
These sap-sucking insect pests can weaken the growth of a wide range of plants especially when the honeydew turns into a black sooty mould.
Keep greenfly under control on your roses, as they increase the risk of sooty mould and spread a virus that can be identified by yellow leaves and twisted growth.
Sooty mould may also develop on these secretions, blackening the leaves and reducing the rate of photosynthesis (Urquhart & Stone 1995).
If you don't get rid of them, they may pass on virus diseases as well as leaving a sticky layer on your plants, which becomes covered in sooty mould.
So often, plants are irreparably damaged before the gardener realises the problem and takes action, but signs include plants developing a puckered appearance, as black sooty mould which grows on the sticky honeydew secreted by the aphids starts to appear on leaves lower down the plant.
He said the insects are very dangerous to crops because they suck sap and excrete the excess sugars as a substance called honeydew, which facilitates the development of a sooty mould and also act as vectors for various plant diseases."Some farmers have lost everything but a team of agricultural experts led by plant doctors are going round the villages enlightening farmers on how to control the pests," said Mr Mokaya.