sorb


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Related to sorb: sorb apple

Sorb

 (sôrb)
n.
A member of a Slavic people inhabiting the region of Lusatia in eastern Germany and southwest Poland.

[German Sorbe, perhaps variant of Serbe, Serb, from Serbian Srb, Serb.]

sorb 1

 (sôrb)
tr.v. sorbed, sorb·ing, sorbs
To take up and hold, as by absorption or adsorption.

[Back-formation from absorb and adsorb.]

sorb′a·bil′i·ty n.
sorb′a·ble adj.
sorb′ent adj. & n.

sorb 2

 (sôrb)
n.
1. Any of several Eurasian trees of the genus Sorbus of the rose family, especially a service tree.
2. The fruit of any of these plants.

[French sorbe, sorb fruit, from Old French sourbe, from Vulgar Latin *sorba, from Latin sorbum.]

sorb

(sɔːb)
n
1. (Plants) another name for service tree1
2. (Plants) any of various related trees, esp the mountain ash
3. (Plants) Also called: sorb apple the fruit of any of these trees
[C16: from Latin sorbus the sorb, service tree]
ˈsorbic adj

Sorb

(sɔːb)
n
(Peoples) a member of a Slavonic people living chiefly in the rural areas of E Germany between the upper reaches of the Oder and Elbe rivers (Lusatia). Also called: Wend or Lusatian

sorb

(sɔrb)

v.t. Chem.
to gather on a surface either by absorption, adsorption, or a combination of the two processes.
[1905–10; extracted from absorb and adsorb]
sorb′a•ble, adj.

Sorb

(sɔrb)

n.
a member of a people who form a Slavic-speaking enclave in E Germany.
[1835–45; < German Sorbe « Sorbian serbje, serbjo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sorb - acid gritty-textured fruit
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
service tree, sorb apple, sorb apple tree, Sorbus domestica - medium-sized European tree resembling the rowan but bearing edible fruit
Verb1.sorb - take up a liquid or a gas either by adsorption or by absorption
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
absorb - become imbued; "The liquids, light, and gases absorb"
adsorb - accumulate (liquids or gases) on the surface
chemisorb - take up a substance by chemisorption
Translations

sorb

[sɔːb] N (= tree) → serbal m; (= fruit) → serba f

Sorb

nSorbe m, → Sorbin f
References in periodicals archive ?
Mato Kosyk, Lutheran Sorb, prepares for ministry in America
'Decide' requires an assessment of the capacity of soil to sorb P because P sorption greatly influences plant yield response curves to applied P fertilisers (Ozanne and Shaw 1967) and calibration of Colwell soil test P used by the 'Decide' model (Moody 2007).
All of these materials take into account that the internal surfaces will be covered with layers of sorbed water molecules which have to be desorbed during the pumpdown.
This pumping surface disrupts the quasi-equilibrium of the cycle by removing molecules before they can impact onto a surface that will allow them to only sorb temporarily.
"The easiest way is to Google SORB and then follow the link to the Massachusetts Web site," Chief Roddy said.
The capacity of soil to retain (sorb) P affects yield increases (responses) of crops and pastures to applied P (Ozanne and Shaw 1967, t968) and affects soil P test calibrations (Helyar and Spencer 1977).
Water vapor can build up within the system and affect pump operation, or process detritus like spongy deposits can begin to sorb water vapor or hydrocarbon contaminants.
Its "Tuff Sorb" material will have application as an oil sorbent for industrial applications, which is a market Mr.
The list of exhibition participants has been extended to include a number of debutants; among them are Maxina TST (Belarus), Paya Tadbir Pakan (Iran), Pietrucha (Poland), SORB Group (Russia) and Molpir (Slovakia).
But hang on, the melon and raspberry sorb et looks all right.
Adding phosphorus (P) to acidic lateritic soils in Western Australia (WA) decreased the capacity of the soils to sorb subsequent applications of P (Barrow 1974, 1999; Barrow et al.
He also has the advantages of being inert so that it won't sorb easily to the inner surfaces of chambers and is present in the atmosphere at only 5 ppm.