sorceress


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sor·cer·ess

 (sôr′sər-ĭs)
n.
A woman who practices sorcery.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sor•cer•ess

(ˈsɔr sər ɪs)

n.
a woman who practices sorcery; witch.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French sorceresse]
usage: See -ess.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sorceress - a woman sorcerersorceress - a woman sorcerer      
Circe - (Greek mythology) a sorceress who detained Odysseus on her island and turned his men into swine
necromancer, sorcerer, thaumaturge, thaumaturgist, wizard, magician - one who practices magic or sorcery
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

sorceress

noun
A woman who practices magic:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
velhotar

sorceress

[ˈsɔːsəres] Nhechicera f, bruja f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sorceress

[ˈsɔːrsərɪs] nsorcière f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sorceress

nHexe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sorceress

[ˈsɔːsərɪs] nmaga, fattucchiera
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
``How comes it, then, I demand of thee once more, that thou hast suffered a brother to bring a paramour, and that paramour a Jewish sorceress, into this holy place, to the stain and pollution thereof?''
``Ay, brother, a Jewish sorceress!'' said the Grand Master, sternly.
"You are welcome, most noble Sorceress, to the land of the Munchkins.
What could the little woman possibly mean by calling her a sorceress, and saying she had killed the Wicked Witch of the East?
Now, it wasn't likely that Dorothy would be looking for wireless messages or would heed the call; but one thing the Historian was sure of, and that was that the powerful Sorceress, Glinda, would know what he was doing and that he desired to communicate with Dorothy.
This was the important Sorceress known as Glinda the Good, who had been of great assistance to both Ozma and Dorothy.
When doth it please you that I shall apprehend the little sorceress?"
Finally she went to a friendly sorceress of our land named Glinda the Good, who heard the story and at once presented Ozma a magic carpet, which would continually unroll beneath our feet and so make a comfortable path for us to cross the desert.
She did not know that she had ever been a girl until she was restored to her natural form by a kind sorceress. Then it was found that she was the only child of the former Ruler of Oz, and was entitled to rule in his place.
So Tip's guardian, however much she might aspire to working magic, realized it was unlawful to be more than a Sorceress, or at most a Wizardess.
Con- ducted by mailed guards bearing flaring torches, we tramped along echoing corridors, and down stone stair- ways dank and dripping, and smelling of mould and ages of imprisoned night -- a chill, uncanny journey and a long one, and not made the shorter or the cheerier by the sorceress's talk, which was about this sufferer and his crime.
"I used to live near the castle of a great Sorceress named Glinda the Good, and she saw my dolls and said they were very pretty.