sorcery


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sor·cer·y

 (sôr′sə-rē)
n.
Use of supernatural power over others through the assistance of spirits; witchcraft.

[Middle English sorcerie, from Old French, from sorcier, sorcerer; see sorcerer.]

sor′cer·ous adj.
sor′cer·ous·ly adv.

sorcery

(ˈsɔːsərɪ)
n, pl -ceries
(Alternative Belief Systems) the art, practices, or spells of magic, esp black magic, by which it is sought to harness occult forces or evil spirits in order to produce preternatural effects in the world
[C13: from Old French sorcerie, from sorcier sorcerer]
ˈsorcerous adj

sor•cer•y

(ˈsɔr sə ri)

n., pl. -cer•ies.
the practices of a person who is thought to have supernatural powers granted by evil spirits; black magic; witchery.
[1250–1300; Middle English sorcerie < Medieval Latin sorceria]

sorcery

the art, practices, or spells of a person who is supposed to exercise supernatural powers through the aid of evil spirits; black magic; witchery. — sorcerer, n. — sorcerous, adj.
See also: Magic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sorcery - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the worldsorcery - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
witchcraft, witchery - the art of sorcery
bewitchment, enchantment - a magical spell
demonism, diabolism, Satanism - a belief in and reverence for devils (especially Satan)
obiism - belief in a kind of sorcery that originated in Africa and is practiced in the West Indies

sorcery

noun black magic, witchcraft, black art, necromancy, spell, magic, charm, wizardry, enchantment, divination, incantation, witchery The man swore never to practise sorcery again, and was released.

sorcery

noun
The use of supernatural powers to influence or predict events:
Translations
السِّحْر بصورةٍ عامَّه
čarodějnictvíkouzla
heksekrafttrolddom
noitavoimanoituus
galdur
burtininkavimasraganavimasraganius
buršanaburvestība
czarna magiaczarnoksięstwoczarymagia
bruxariapoder mágico
čary
büyübüyücülük

sorcery

[ˈsɔːsərɪ] Nhechicería f, brujería f

sorcery

nHexerei f

sorcery

[ˈsɔːsrɪ] nstregoneria

sorcery

(ˈsoːsəri) noun
1. the use of power gained from evil spirits.
2. witchcraft or magic in general.
ˈsorcererfeminine ˈsorceress noun
a person who practises sorcery.
References in classic literature ?
What is your sorcery good for if it cannot tell us the truth?
Let me see you equal the sorcery I am about to perform.
The Preceptor had hardly given the necessary orders, when he was joined by Conrade Mont-Fitchet, who acquainted him with the Grand Master's resolution to bring the Jewess to instant trial for sorcery.
It is true," said the good old man, "and indeed, sir, as far as the charge of sorcery goes I was not guilty; as to that of being a pimp I cannot deny it; but I never thought I was doing any harm by it, for my only object was that all the world should enjoy itself and live in peace and quiet, without quarrels or troubles; but my good intentions were unavailing to save me from going where I never expect to come back from, with this weight of years upon me and a urinary ailment that never gives me a moment's ease;" and again he fell to weeping as before, and such compassion did Sancho feel for him that he took out a real of four from his bosom and gave it to him in alms.
It was sorcery, magic of the worst kind, thought Buldeo, and he wondered whether the amulet round his neck would protect him.
The sorcery of the Phanfasms permitted him to see no more.
He was once, but he has reformed and now assists Glinda the Good, who is the Royal Sorceress of Oz and the only one licensed to practice magic or sorcery.
Confessing that she had frightened her servant by a description of sorcery, as it was practiced among the slaves on her father's estate, she only lied again, in declaring that Mrs.
Maule's well, all this time, though left in solitude, was throwing up a succession of kaleidoscopic pictures, in which a gifted eye might have seen foreshadowed the coming fortunes of Hepzibah and Clifford, and the descendant of the legendary wizard, and the village maiden, over whom he had thrown Love's web of sorcery.
Can we, then, by the citation of some of those instances wherein this thing of whiteness --though for the time either wholly or in great part stripped of all direct associations calculated to impart to it aught fearful, but, nevertheless, is found to exert over us the same sorcery, however modified; --can we thus hope to light upon some chance clue to conduct us to the hidden cause we seek?
There's sorcery at the bottom of it," said a sinister voice in the crowd.
peasant who had been accused of sorcery was put to the torture to