sordor

sordor

(ˈsɔːdə)
n
sordidness
References in periodicals archive ?
Over 200 years before David Cameron gave upper-crust puerile sordor a bad name, Smith had flayed the ethical pretensions afflicting Cameron's alma mater, Eton, no less than Winchester itself:
The sordor and filths of nature, the sun shall dry up, and the wind exhale.
"Retarred, icy lion-warder Deb bags sordor!" Stevi riled.
For example, in order to understand Gertrude's curious description of Ophelia's suicide, Neill juxtaposes the "hollowness of [her] consolatory artifice" to the "sordor and mockery of the grave-digging sequence" (233) that follows.