sortition


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sortition

(sɔːˈtɪʃən)
n
the act of casting lots
[C16: from Latin sortitio, from sortiri to cast lots]

sortition

the casting of lots, as in a gambling game.
See also: Gambling
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sortition - making a chance decision by using lots (straws or pebbles etc.) that are thrown or drawn
decision, determination, conclusion - the act of making up your mind about something; "the burden of decision was his"; "he drew his conclusions quickly"
References in periodicals archive ?
Festival goers are invited to learn more about Extinction Rebellions third demand with a mock citizens assembly on climate and ecological justice - through selecting participants randomly, via a process known as sortition - through deliberation to decision making.
Prosecutors said he planned to use the bomb to kill himself and draw attention to a political system called sortition, in which public officials are chosen randomly rather than elected.
* Would choosing the second chamber by sortition be an effective way to achieve a 50:50 balance between men and women?
The Studied cohort was assembled through sortition of cities from the regions, where there have been more than 40 cases through the year, totaling 33 and 90 cities, respectively, in the South and Southeast regions(2).
This kind of selection by "sortition" is how we choose juries, and Van Reybrouck points to instances around the modern democratic world where it has been used to help shape key decisions and encourage deliberation.
One way to remove bias from decision making is to base a given selection on a random method such as a coin flip or another, neutral means of sortition such as a lottery or drawing names from a hat.
There are also practices that resemble gambling in various ways but do not involve placing bets, such as cleromancy, sortition, and drawing of lots, as well as contemporary activities such as trading on the stock market (Hertz, 1988; Kellaway, 2013) and social gaming on the internet (Gainsbury et al.
3), such as sortition or random selection (Carson & Martin, 1999), for staffing "elected" positions in more statistically represented and less pathological ways as we, at the same, time open up economic and organizational spaces to democratic practice .
there was a need for development of proficiency instruments which assessed performance, not in terms of how an individual compared with other individuals, but with respect to how adequately he or she had attained the level of competence required for system operation." The machinery of norm-referenced testing had been evolving since the mid-19th Century, which Edgeworth (1888:626) correctly described as "a species of sortition".
The selective tournament of Euro-2016 will begin in September 2014 and sortition will take place in spring