soterial

soterial

(səʊˈtɪərɪəl)
adj
(Theology) theol relating to salvation
References in periodicals archive ?
a cornerstone of scriptural interpretation and soterial doctrine in the Reformed tradition" (274-75).
6) Davies, citing A Golden Chaine by William Perkins, explains how the reprobate would repeatedly promise and move in the direction of repentance, but always without completing the necessary stages, thereby creating what Davies calls "a soterial game of snakes and ladders" ("Lateness," 357).
Christian's soterial journey yields relief from his burden at the sight of the cross, and he eventually realizes his goal of obtaining the better country that he desired.
World Saviors and Messiahs of the Roman Empire: 28 BCE-135 CE: The Soterial Age.
World saviors and messiahs of the Roman Empire, 28 BCE-135 CE; the Soterial age.
What they call the Soterial Age, from the Greek sotor savior, was characterized by the rise of many new sects in the Empire all looking to a living or recently-living Savior.
In February 1722 Defoe published Due Preparations for the Plague, a manual for practical and soterial provisions against the disease, in which his criticisms of the Bills continue, anticipating those of H.
So also did George Downame, bishop of Derry, in The Covenant of Grace (1631), a soterial primer with a covenantal frame that its author published in the face of Laud's efforts to suppress it.