sotto voce


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

sot·to vo·ce

 (sŏt′ō vō′chē, sōt′tō vō′chĕ)
adv. & adj.
1. In soft tones, so as not to be overheard; in an undertone: "There were aspersions cast, sotto voce, but knees quickly folded into curtsies when introductions were in order" (Barbara Lazear Ascher).
2. Music In very soft tones. Used chiefly as a direction.

[Italian : sotto, under + voce, voice.]

sotto voce

(ˈsɒtəʊ ˈvəʊtʃɪ)
adv
(Classical Music) in an undertone
[C18: from Italian: under (one's) voice]

sot•to vo•ce

(ˈsɒt oʊ ˈvoʊ tʃi; It. ˈsɔt tɔ ˈvɔ tʃɛ)
adv.
in a low, soft voice so as not to be overheard.
[1730–40; < Italian: literally, under (the) voice]

sotto voce

1. An Italian phrase meaning below the voice, used to mean in an undertone, or something said in an undertone.
2. in a low voice
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.sotto voce - in an undertone; "he uttered a curse sotto voce"
Translations

sotto voce

[ˈsɒtəʊˈvəʊtʃɪ] ADVen voz baja

sotto voce

advleise; (= conspiratorially)mit unterdrückter Stimme; (Mus) → sotto voce
References in classic literature ?
Today, therefore, I crept humbly to my seat and sat down in such a crouching posture that Efim Akimovitch (the most touchy man in the world) said to me sotto voce: "What on earth makes you sit like that, Makar Alexievitch?" Then he pulled such a grimace that everyone near us rocked with laughter at my expense.
" I know," said Philip; and Maggie buried her face in her hands while he sang sotto voce , "Love in her eyes sits playing," and then said, "That's it, isn't it?"
A more elastic footstep entered next; and now I opened my mouth for a 'good-morning,' but closed it again, the salutation unachieved; for Hareton Earnshaw was performing his orison SOTTO VOCE, in a series of curses directed against every object he touched, while he rummaged a corner for a spade or shovel to dig through the drifts.
Poyser would probably have brought her rejoinder to a further climax, if every one's attention had not at this moment been called to the other end of the table, where the lyricism, which had at first only manifested itself by David's sotto voce performance of "My love's a rose without a thorn," had gradually assumed a rather deafening and complex character.
Seating myself near the window, a little back from the circle, I called Arthur to me, and he and I and Sancho amused ourselves very pleasantly together, while the two young ladies baited his mother with small talk, and Fergus sat opposite with his legs crossed and his hands in his breeches-pockets, leaning back in his chair, and staring now up at the ceiling, now straight forward at his hostess (in a manner that made me strongly inclined to kick him out of the room), now whistling sotto voce to himself a snatch of a favourite air, now interrupting the conversation, or filling up a pause (as the case might be) with some most impertinent question or remark.
He replaces them all by faint sensations, and especially by pronunciation of words sotto voce. When we "think" of a table (say), as opposed to seeing it, what happens, according to him, is usually that we are making small movements of the throat and tongue such as would lead to our uttering the word "table" if they were more pronounced.
The Muse of Music, Miss Halcombe, deserts us in dismay, and I, the fat old minstrel, exhale the rest of my enthusiasm in the open air!" He stalked out into the verandah, put his hands in his pockets, and resumed the Recitativo of Moses, sotto voce, in the garden.
Reed sotto voce; and gathering up her work, she abruptly quitted the apartment.
The order to get upstairs and brush their teeth must be delivered at all times sotto voce, even when you should have left the house 10 minutes before.
However, when a chair and ottoman won't do, inevitably, a shy sotto voce request from the husband will come for a reclining chair, while behind his back, the wife shakes her head and makes ugly faces a la "I Love Lucy."
Vratonga's Act II "Credo" offers a grand and robustly sung display of his evil plans, and in contrast, he achieves a lovely sotto voce and superb control in Act II's softly intoned "Era la notte," as he relates to Otello how he overheard Cassio speaking about Desdemona in his sleep.
1 and 2 will consist of 'Bloom' by Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, 'Arachnida' by Agnes Locsin, 'Sotto Voce' and 'Reconfigured' by Bam Damian, 'Kinabuhing Mananagat' by Rudy de Dios, 'Romeo and Juliet (Fantasy Overture)' by Sergei Vikulov, 'Reve' by Ernest Mandap, 'Musika't Pag-ibig' by Jonathan Janolo and 'Mahiwagang Biyulin' by Tony Fabella.