soullessly


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soul·less

 (sōl′lĭs)
adj.
Lacking sensitivity or the capacity for deep feeling.

soul′less·ly adv.
soul′less·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.soullessly - in a soulless manner; "they were soullessly grubbing for profit"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, the fact that his jewels are on permanent exhibit and not resting soullessly in someone's steel vault fulfills their raison d'etre.
If it be the cosmic world, for a man like Cincinnatus, invitation to death becomes more congenial than living soullessly. Living in a world obsessed with this kind of transparency and materialism, Cincinnatus "not only avoids physically touching his executioner, but he even attempts to exorcise his own corporeal self" (Davydov 1995: 193).
Streiner, The Evidence For and Against Evidence-Based Practice, 4 BRIEF Treatment & Crisis Intervention 111, 111 (2004) (explaining that evidence-based policymaking has been both "heralded as one of the major advances in health care, education, criminal justice, and the human services, promising to revolutionize both policymaking and practice" and "excoriated as a development that will reduce professionals to mindlessly (and soullessly) following recipe books for the betterment of insurance companies").
It doesn't make your socks go red, like clay-court tennis; it doesn't make that soullessly hollow sound, like indoor tennis; and it doesn't make the ball loop a mile in the air, like my tennis.
Our industry has to show that it matters and it is not soullessly obsessed with consumerism and self-glorification.
It took both Coen brothers and two additional screenwriters, plus the directorial wand of Angelina Jolie, to turn Laura Hillenbrand's four-million-copy bestseller Unbroken (2010) into a respectful but banal film that plods soullessly for over two hours while saying little that is fresh about being a prisoner of the Japanese in World War II--one of the book's primary themes.
This two-fisted, free-flying persona made Goldwater the kind of politician that film director Howard Hawks might have come up with; by comparison, government couldn't help appearing soullessly oppressive.