sourly


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sour

 (sour)
adj. sour·er, sour·est
1. Having a taste characteristic of that produced by acids; sharp, tart, or tangy.
2. Made acid or rancid by fermentation.
3. Having the characteristics of fermentation or rancidity; tasting or smelling of decay.
4.
a. Bad-tempered and morose; peevish: a sour temper.
b. Displeased with something one formerly admired or liked; disenchanted: sour on ballet.
5.
a. Not measuring up to the expected or usual ability or quality; bad: a sour performance of the play.
b. Not having the correct or properly produced pitch: a sour note.
6. Of or relating to excessively acid soil that is damaging to crops.
7.
a. Containing excessive levels of sulfur compounds, carbon dioxide, or both. Used of oil and natural gas.
b. Containing excessive levels of peroxides. Used of gasoline.
n.
1. The sensation of sour taste, one of the four primary tastes.
2. Something sour.
3. A mixed drink made especially with whiskey, lemon or lime juice, sugar, and sometimes soda water.
tr. & intr.v. soured, sour·ing, sours
1. To make or become sour.
2. To make or become disagreeable, disillusioned, or disenchanted.

[Middle English, from Old English sūr.]

sour′ish adj.
sour′ly adv.
sour′ness n.
Synonyms: sour, acerbic, acid, acidic, tart1
These adjectives mean having a taste like that produced by an acid: sour lemons; an acerbic vinegar; the acid taste of guavas; a lightly acidic coffee; tart cherries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.sourly - in a sour manner; "he complained sourly that the new rules only benefitted the managers"
Translations
بِفَظاظَه، بِحُموضَه
kysele
savanyúan
fÿlulega
huysuzlukla

sourly

[ˈsaʊəlɪ] ADV
1. (= disagreeably) [say, complain, look] → agriamente; [think] → con amargura
2. to smell sourly (of sth)despedir un olor agrio (a algo)

sourly

[ˈsaʊərli] adv [say] → d'un ton acerbe; [think] → amèrement; [smile] → amèrement

sourly

sourly

[ˈsaʊəlɪ] adv (remark, look) → aspramente

sour

(ˈsauə) adjective
1. having a taste or smell similar in nature to that of lemon juice or vinegar. Unripe apples are/taste very sour.
2. having a similar taste as a stage in going bad. sour milk.
3. (of a person, his character etc) discontented, bad-tempered or disagreeable. She was looking very sour this morning.
verb
to make or become sour.
ˈsourly adverb
ˈsourness noun
References in classic literature ?
I watched her for nearly half-an-hour: during all that time she never turned a page, and her face grew momently darker, more dissatisfied, and more sourly expressive of disappointment.
he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine aid to digest his dinner, and his pious ejaculation had no reference to my unexpected advent.
The Templar smiled sourly as he replied, ``Beshrew thee for a false-hearted liar
I'd lay into him naow ef he was mine," said Uncle Salters, sourly.
He dashed to the fire, where he found the lama already surrounded by dishes of food, the hillmen visibly adoring him and the Southerners looking sourly.
You must remember," said Summerlee, sourly, "that I have a large class in London who are at present at the mercy of an extremely inefficient locum tenens.
When Robin saw this train drawing near, with flash of jewels and silk and jingle of silver bells on the trappings of the nags, he looked sourly upon them.
If the mouth has fallen sourly yours the blame: all the meannesses your youth concealed have been gathering in your face.
Well, you lived an obstinate dogmatist, and you mean to die one," said Summerlee sourly.
He rolled, at a rough estimate, thirty grains of quinine in a cigarette paper, regarded the result sourly for a moment, then swallowed it at a gulp.
You'd better leave Big Alec alone," Carmintel said, rather sourly, to Charley that night.
He could not or would not take the trouble to characterize for me the appearance of that man now officially a criminal (we had gone across the road for a drink) but told me with a sourly, derisive snigger that, after the sentence had been pronounced the fellow clung to the dock long enough to make a sort of protest.