sovietism


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sovietism

(ˈsəʊvɪɪˌtɪzəm; ˈsɒv-)
n (sometimes capital)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle or practice of government through soviets, esp as practised in the former Soviet Union
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any characteristic deemed representative of Soviet ideology
ˈsovietist n, adj
ˌsovietˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sovietism, sovietism

1. the soviet system of government and the principles and practices of such a government.
2. a policy, action, etc., typical of the Soviet Union. — Sovietist, sovietist, n., adj.
See also: Russia
1. the soviet system of government and the principles and practices of such a government.
2. a policy, action, etc., typical of the Soviet Union. — Sovietist, sovietist, n., adj.
See also: Government
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sovietism - Soviet communismsovietism - Soviet communism      
communism - a form of socialism that abolishes private ownership
revisionism - a moderate evolutionary form of Marxism
revisionism - any dangerous departure from the teachings of Marx
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the era of Sovietism ended in 1989, a wealth of civic and humanitarian organizations emerged to aid the Warsaw Pact countries in the transition from state-sponsored socialism to market-economy democracy.
The challenges set by 20th century eurofascism and Sovietism were altogether more powerful, and were both seen off.
Eurasianism, with its tinge of "Sovietism," became quite popular in post-Soviet Russia and beyond, as the attraction of Western models declined.
For example, the leveling, class-war collectivism of the revolutionary Great Break upheaval with which the Stalin period began differed vastly from the hierarchical, conservative patriotism of the postwar "ice age of Sovietism" with which it ended.
There is no attempt to suppress news simply because it is unfavorable to Sovietism. It is only on specific stories that the correspondents complain of being gagged.
One is surrounded by incessant assurances that Sovietism is the new and victorious ideology that will solve all social, moral, economic and political problems.
Between Sovietism and Americanization: ideals of femininity during and after the Cold War in Finland.
Similar arguments were made in 1989: Sovietism was Marxism.
Ossetians themselves claimed that they did not have any better choice than looking for security guarantees from the Kremlin, "striving for survival as an ethnohistorical entity--and identity--drove [them] 'to side with Soviet Russia'--not [their] genetic love for bolshevism, sovietism and other 'isms' ..." (26)
This "Sovietism" makes it difficult for either Islamic extremism or democratization to make headway, he suggests.
By 1930, the grim ghost of unemployment began to stalk abroad, food, raiment and other material commodities began to get cheaper, England fringed the abyss of bankruptcy through the dole, Germany went bankrupt anyhow, and the Central and Eastern European nations were on the verge of falling between the two stools of Fascism and Sovietism. The world was either to be capitalized or communized, in either case, to be brutalized, in lieu of the sane medium tenuere tutissimum.