soy


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soy

 (soi)
n.
1. The soybean.
2. Soy sauce.

[Dutch soja, from Japanese shōyu, soy sauce, from Middle Chinese tsiaŋ` jiw (also the source of Mandarin jiàngyóu) : Middle Chinese tsiaŋ`, soy paste + Middle Chinese jiw, oil, sauce.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

soy

(sɔɪ)
n
1. (Plants) US and Canadian another name for soya bean
2. (Cookery) another name for soy sauce
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

soy

(sɔɪ)

n.
the soybean.
[1690–1700; perhaps via Dutch or New Latin < Japanese shōyu, earlier shaũyu < Middle Chinese, derivative of Chinese jìngyóu soybean oil]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soy - a source of oilsoy - a source of oil; used for forage and soil improvement and as food
Glycine max, soja, soja bean, soya, soybean plant, soya bean, soybean, soy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
bean - any of various seeds or fruits that are beans or resemble beans
2.soy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowerssoy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
soya, soya bean, soybean, soy - the most highly proteinaceous vegetable known; the fruit of the soybean plant is used in a variety of foods and as fodder (especially as a replacement for animal protein)
legume, leguminous plant - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
genus Glycine, Glycine - genus of Asiatic erect or sprawling herbs: soya bean
soy, soya bean, soybean - a source of oil; used for forage and soil improvement and as food
3.soy - thin sauce made of fermented soy beanssoy - thin sauce made of fermented soy beans
soya, soya bean, soybean, soy - the most highly proteinaceous vegetable known; the fruit of the soybean plant is used in a variety of foods and as fodder (especially as a replacement for animal protein)
condiment - a preparation (a sauce or relish or spice) to enhance flavor or enjoyment; "mustard and ketchup are condiments"
4.soy - the most highly proteinaceous vegetable known; the fruit of the soybean plant is used in a variety of foods and as fodder (especially as a replacement for animal protein)
soy flour, soybean flour, soybean meal - meal made from soybeans
soyabean oil, soybean oil - oil from soya beans
bean, edible bean - any of various edible seeds of plants of the family Leguminosae used for food
field soybean - seeds used as livestock feed
soy sauce, soy - thin sauce made of fermented soy beans
Glycine max, soja, soja bean, soya, soybean plant, soya bean, soybean, soy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
sója
soja
soijasoijakastikesoijapapu
soja
szója
kecap
大豆醤油
soja
ถั่วเหลือง
đậu nành

soy

صُويَا sója soja Soja σόγια soja, soya soija soja soja soia 大豆 soja soya soja soja соя soja ถั่วเหลือง soya đậu nành 大豆
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

soy

n soja or soya
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: A new market study, titled "Discover Global South America Soy Beverages Market Upcoming Trends, Growth Drivers and Challenges" has been featured on WiseGuyReports.
[USPRwire, Wed Jul 17 2019] Fact.MR's in its new report reveals that the global soy protein hydrolysate market is set to witness a CAGR of 6.6% during the forecast (2017-2026).
[ClickPress, Wed Apr 03 2019] Rising preference for functional food products among consumers is motivating manufacturers to use innovative methods to offering healthy and nutritious content such as soy protein hydrolysate.
While many people rely on animal-based proteins to get their daily recommended intake of protein, soy foods are naturally free of cholesterol and low in saturated fats.
High consumption of soy has been hypothesised to be protective against cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, results of clinical studies assessing the association have been inconsistent.
Two of the most common soy meat extenders--textured soy flour and textured soy concentrate--are often confused.
Soy is a bean used to produce products such as soy milk, soy sauce, miso, tempeh, and tofu.
Concern about soy consumption stems from the theory that isoflavones, micronutrients in soy, may raise the risk of hormone-related cancers.
Myth #2: Soy contains "anti-nutrients." Soy, like other wholesome plant foods, such as whole wheat and potatoes, contains phytates, which may reduce the absorption of some minerals.
So what's the real scoop on soy? The short answer is that, while you may want to avoid highly concentrated soy-derived supplements, you can keep noshing on tofu and edamame.
A Chinese study, published in the March 25, 2013 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found that of 444 women with lung cancer, those who consumed the most soy milk, tofu and similar products before their diagnosis were seven to eight percent less likely to die during a 13-year span than women lung cancer patients who consumed little or no soy.
He said that even so, half the animals that consumed tomato and soy had no cancerous lesions in the prostate at study's end.