spammer


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spam

 (spăm)
n.
1. Unsolicited email, often of a commercial nature, sent indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups; junk email.
2. A single piece of such email: "receiving dozens of spams a day" (George Johnson).
tr.v. spammed, spam·ming, spams
1. To send unsolicited email to.
2. To send (a message) indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups.

[From Spam (probably inspired by a comedy routine on the British television series Monty Python's Flying Circus, in which the word is repeated incessantly).]

spam·mer n.

Spam

 (spăm)
A trademark for a canned meat product consisting primarily of chopped pork pressed into a loaf.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spammer - someone who sends unwanted email (often in bulk)spammer - someone who sends unwanted email (often in bulk)
sender, transmitter - someone who transmits a message; "return to sender"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

spammer

[ˈspæməʳ] N (Internet) → spammer mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

spammer

[ˈspæmər] nspammeur/euse m/f, polluposteur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Only ISPs, state attorneys general and the federal government can bring a civil or criminal action against a spammer under the federal law; individuals cannot.
It can take just one buyer from 100,000 e-mails for a spammer to make a profit.
Some Large enterprises have already passed the 50% barrier earlier this year." The recent Sobig.F virus that plagued thousands of computers in late summer was thought to be the work of spammer masterminds to distribute unwanted e-mails and product promotions.
I'd be interested to see if such a list ever stops a serious spammer. There are so many ways round them including the highly technical approach of abandoning your blacklisted address and starting afresh with a new pc, ISP or e-mail account.
The spammer buys dial-up and broadband accounts under various aliases so that when one is terminated, another can quickly be activated.
It looks at the IP address of the sender, to see if the email is coming from a known spammer. Dewqs' NMS also performs keyword searches, and flags emails that have words and phrases that you have defined as inappropriate.
* The ability to click a button and have iHateSpam attempt to send a spammer an automated message informing them that your e-mail address "is not a valid email address."
Experts on the subject agree the worst thing you can do is reply to a spammer to ask that your address be removed from his list.
For a spammer, one "hit" among thousands of mailings is enough to justify the practice.
Bridges said he didn't think anyone had actually collected a fine from a spammer under the Colorado bill.
If there is a valid e-mail address on the message, forward a copy of the message to the Internet service provider of the spammer, and indicate that you do not want to receive unsolicited e-mail from this source.
Simson Garfinkel (RISKS 18, 79) notes that a spammer recently hacked his vineyard.net, sending about 66,000 messages.