spanghew

spanghew

(ˈspæŋˌhjuː)
vb (tr)
dialect to throw into the air
References in periodicals archive ?
SPANGHEW To throw into the air like a child on a sea saw.
For example, at the word level Ghost is filled with the bliss of etymology from "abbatoir" to "spanghew." At the grammatical level, Almon uses the possessive in surprising ways: "My First Alien," "my belated soul," "my first lactating cab driver." At the sentence level, he uses chiasmus as a rhetorical mirror to highlight key moments: "giving / my fears a voice, giving my voice its fear" ("The Undertow"); "I would correct everything / but nothing can be corrected" ("The Only Words of My Bryson Grandmother"); "Christ's parables found the sacred in the ordinary / but here is the ordinary in the sacred" ("Absence of Ultramarine, Presence of Indigo").
SPANGHEW: To cause a frog or toad to fly into the air (usually by hitting it with a stick).