spasmatic

spasmatic

(spæzˈmætɪk) or

spasmatical

adj
(Pathology) obsolete given to spasms
References in periodicals archive ?
These included works on paper from the early '80s such as 1981's Spasmatic Pain 1 (Boulder Community Hospital), a disquieting abstract drawing whose acid colors complement an intense scrawl that mimics both illegible script and the output of some medical monitoring device attached to a manic patient.
For now, we need only note that the space of narrative is created out of an incessant displacement (of desire, of the sign), which Drieu himself identifies, with a certain theoretical consistency, as the spasmatic, "cette douceur infinie du spasme" that Gilles undergoes in the living out of his story.
Putting the epilogue in parentheses for the moment, we can think of the novel's third part, the ironically-entitled L'Apocalypse, as marking the end of Gilles - an end that purports to bring the spasmatic flow of Gilles's "life" to a head, but which then, having registered the futility of this attempt, goes on to revel in its own failure.
Apres ce dernier spasme sans issue la France ne pouvait plus que descendre au niveau de la mort" (607), it is asserted; yet we have no reason to believe that the spasmatic rule of narrative has ended at this point.