spasmodism

spasmodism

a tendency to conduct marked by outbursts of strong emotion. — spasmodist, n. — spasmodic, spasmodical, adj.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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And his signal advance on Bailey, Smith, and Bigg was to stage this impasse, using monodramatic form to display a spasmodic impulsiveness much like his predecessors', while at the same time exposing spasmodism as a system at odds with itself.
(21) Nevertheless, the terms of spasmodism furnished no other remedy for official imposture than the fantasized imposition of a different single vision, namely the poet's.
It is in part for its not being anomalous that Dobell's Spasmodism seems dangerous to his critics (the mutterings of a madman might more easily have been dismissed).
Stanyan Bigg attempted to use the pathological "Spasmodism" of their poetry to promote a radical poetics, while simultaneously displaying considerable anxiety about the interaction between spasms, illness, and femininity.
Although male poets and their poetic characters had more to lose than either Aurora or her creator by being perceived as effeminate and prone to disease, Aurora seeks to resist the connections among poetry, disease, and Spasmodism precisely because they might be taken for granted in her case.
(5) Saintsbury offers to solve the awkward problem of Clough's superlative education by relating his Spasmodism to his departures from "strict literature," yet this begs the question of whether "strict literature" is a tool by which Clough can fairly be measured, especially if it must be distinguished from religiosity, as Saintsbury implies.
Glimpsing our own lenses through the parallactic mirrors of a sesqui-century ago, we may acquire motives and means for grinding new lenses: an unapologetic taste for the middlebrow, say (Charles LaPorte), for the designedly minor (James Najarian), or for the standards-busting over-the-top poetics of Spasmodism (Jason Rudy).
(2) For a discussion of the poem's spasmodism, see Joseph J.
More broadly, associating Swinburne with spasmodism suggests ways in which he can be read in relation to the popular working-class poetry of his day.
There may be less contradiction between these positions than one assumes, if one accepts Tucker's view that Spasmodism is Romanticism "enlarged upon, and inevitably vulgarized" (p.
Thus, rather than representing "curative" poetry, like In Memoriam, Maud indicates the speaker's alignment with spasmodism and sensationalism.
It should be said at first that the Spasmodic poets constituted a "school" in name only; most of those who came to be associated with Spasmodism did not know one another, or developed relationships after having published their major poems.