speciation

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Related to speciations: specifications, Allopatric speciation

spe·ci·a·tion

 (spē′shē-ā′shən, -sē-)
n.
The formation of new biological species through the process of evolution.


spe′ci·ate′ v.
spe′ci·a′tion·al adj.

speciation

(ˌspiːʃɪˈeɪʃən)
n
(Biology) the evolutionary development of a biological species, as by geographical isolation of a group of individuals from the main stock
[C20: from species + -ation]

spe•ci•a•tion

(ˌspi ʃiˈeɪ ʃən, -siˈeɪ-)

n.
the formation of new species as a result of geographic, physiological, anatomical, or behavioral factors that prevent previously interbreeding populations from breeding with each other.
[1895–1900]

spe·ci·a·tion

(spē′shē-ā′shən)
The formation of new biological species by the development or branching of one species into two or more genetically distinct ones. According to the theory of evolution, all life on Earth has resulted from the speciation of earlier organisms.

speciation

the formation of new species.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.speciation - the evolution of a biological species
organic evolution, phylogenesis, phylogeny, evolution - (biology) the sequence of events involved in the evolutionary development of a species or taxonomic group of organisms
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
This contrasts with other known animal speciations, in which the emergence of the new species occurs only once.
Asami says this marks the first reported example of single-gene speciation.
Greenwood's definition of a species flock does not include a requirement that the speciations be recent, but in practice the term usually is applied to groups thought to have arisen from recent adaptive radiations.
Indeed, if many speciations truly were close to one another in time, poor resolution of branching order of numerous internal nodes would be an expected signature of an explosive radiation.
Vrba's theory predicts that climate change should affect disparate groups of animals by triggering a round of extinctions and then speciations within a limited time.