offal

(redirected from specified bovine offal)
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of·fal

 (ô′fəl, ŏf′əl)
n.
1. Waste material or byproducts from a manufacturing process.
2. Meat, including internal organs (such as liver, heart, or kidney) and extremities (such as tail or hooves), that has been taken from a part other than skeletal muscles. Also called variety meat.
3. Refuse; rubbish.

[Middle English : of-, off (from Old English, from of; see apo- in Indo-European roots) + fal, fall.]

offal

(ˈɒfəl)
n
1. (Cookery) the edible internal parts of an animal, such as the heart, liver, and tongue
2. dead or decomposing organic matter
3. refuse; rubbish
[C14: from off + fall, referring to parts fallen or cut off; compare German Abfall rubbish]

of•fal

(ˈɔ fəl, ˈɒf əl)

n.
1. waste parts, esp. the viscera or inedible remains of a butchered animal.
2. refuse or rubbish; garbage.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =of off + fal fall; compare Dutch afval]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.offal - viscera and trimmings of a butchered animal often considered inedible by humans
organs, variety meat - edible viscera of a butchered animal
Translations
indmad
belsõség
innmatur
plaučkepeniai
subprodukti

offal

[ˈɒfəl] Nasaduras fpl, menudillos mpl

offal

[ˈɒfəl] nabats mpl

offal

n no plInnereien pl; (fig)Abfall m, → Ausschuss m

offal

[ˈɒfl] nfrattaglie fpl

offal

(ˈofəl) noun
the parts of an animal eg the heart, liver etc which are considered as food for people.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noteworthy that none of the 162 UK patients with vCJD identified up to September 2006 were born after 1989, the year in which the specified bovine offal ban was introduced to minimize human exposure to BSE; however, 2 of the 34 non-UK vCJD case-patients were born after 1989.
AIt is currently considered that the most likely explanation for the present cases of vCJD is the consumption of BSE-infected beef before the specified bovine offal ban came into force in 1989.
This committee concluded that "although there is no direct evidence of a link on current data, and in the absence of any credible alternative, the most likely explanation at present is that these cases are linked to exposure to BSE before the introduction of the specified bovine offal ban in 1989.

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