specimen


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spec·i·men

 (spĕs′ə-mən)
n.
1. An individual, item, or part representative of a class or whole. See Synonyms at example.
2. An organism, part of an organism, or fossil that has been collected and usually preserved, especially for display or scientific research.
3. A sample, as of tissue, blood, or urine, used for analysis and diagnosis.
4. Informal An individual; a person: a disagreeable specimen.

[Latin, example, from specere, to look at; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

specimen

(ˈspɛsɪmɪn)
n
1.
a. an individual, object, or part regarded as typical of the group or class to which it belongs
b. (as modifier): a specimen signature; a specimen page.
2. (Medicine) med a sample of tissue, blood, urine, etc, taken for diagnostic examination or evaluation
3. (Biology) the whole or a part of an organism, plant, rock, etc, collected and preserved as an example of its class, species, etc
4. informal often derogatory a person
[C17: from Latin: mark, evidence, proof, from specere to look at]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spec•i•men

(ˈspɛs ə mən)

n.
1. a part or an individual taken as exemplifying a whole mass or number; a typical animal, mineral, etc.
2. a sample of a substance or material for examination or study.
3. a particular or peculiar kind of person.
[1600–10; < Latin: mark, example =speci-, s. of specere to look + -men n. suffix of result or means]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.specimen - an example regarded as typical of its classspecimen - an example regarded as typical of its class
example, instance, illustration, representative - an item of information that is typical of a class or group; "this patient provides a typical example of the syndrome"; "there is an example on page 10"
2.specimen - a bit of tissue or blood or urine that is taken for diagnostic purposes; "they collected a urine specimen for urinalysis"
cytologic specimen - a specimen used for cytologic examination and diagnosis
sample - all or part of a natural object that is collected and preserved as an example of its class
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

specimen

noun
1. sample, example, individual, model, type, pattern, instance, representative, exemplar, exemplification a perfect specimen of a dinosaur fossil
2. example, model, exhibit, embodiment, type a fine specimen of manhood
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

specimen

noun
One that is representative of a group or class:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نموذَج، عَيِّنَه
vzorekexemplářukázka
eksempelprøve
esimerkki
sÿnishorn
標本見本
eksemplārsparaugs

specimen

[ˈspesɪmɪn]
A. N
1. (= sample) [of blood, urine, tissue, rock] → muestra f
2. (= example) [of species, genus, etc] → ejemplar m, espécimen m
that trout is a fine specimenesa trucha es un magnífico ejemplar
3. (= person) he's an odd specimenes un bicho raro
you're a pretty poor specimenno vales para mucho
B. CPD specimen copy Nejemplar m de muestra
specimen page Npágina f que sirve de muestra
specimen signature Nmuestra f de firma
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

specimen

[ˈspɛsɪmɪn] n
[plant, animal] → spécimen m
(= example) → spécimen m
(MEDICINE) [blood, urine] → échantillon mspecimen copy nspécimen mspecimen signature nspécimen m de signature
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

specimen

nExemplar nt; (of urine, blood etc)Probe f; (= sample)Muster nt; a beautiful or fine specimenein Prachtexemplar nt; if that’s a specimen of your workwenn das eine Probe deines Könnens ist; you’re a pretty poor specimen (inf)du hast ja nicht viel zu bieten (inf)
adj attrProbe-; specimen pageProbeseite f; a specimen copyein Beleg- or Probeexemplar nt; a specimen signatureeine Unterschriftenprobe
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

specimen

[ˈspɛsɪmɪn] n (sample, gen) → campione m; (of rock, species) → esemplare m
he's an odd specimen (fig) → è un tipo strano
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

specimen

(ˈspesimin) noun
something used as a sample (of a group or kind of something, especially an object to be studied or to be put in a collection). We looked at specimens of different types of rock under the microscope.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

spec·i·men

n. espécimen, muestra.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

specimen

n espécimen m, muestra
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Accordingly, having made everything snug in camp, the party, Tom and Ned equipped with electric rifles, and the professor with a butterfly net and specimen boxes, set forth.
Did erudite Stubb, mounted upon your capstan, deliver lectures on the anatomy of the Cetacea; and by help of the windlass, hold up a specimen rib for exhibition?
Every one who has heard you speak has felt, and, I am confident, every one who reads your book will feel, persuaded that you give them a fair specimen of the whole truth.
The Psychologist leant forward to see, holding out his hand for a specimen.
We were accompanied by the son of a neighbouring farmer -- a good specimen of a wild Brazilian youth.
For this reason I have chosen one of his simpler poems as a specimen.
They use that moon no more For the same end as before - Videlicet a tent - Which I think extravagant: Its atomies, however, Into a shower dissever, Of which those butterflies, Of Earth, who seek the skies, And so come down again(Never-contented things!) Have brought a specimen Upon their quivering wings.
"Apart from exaggeration, he is certainly a well-grown specimen," said the Professor, complacently.
By all the codes which I am acquainted with, I am a devilishly wicked specimen of the sex.
And who substituted for the ancient gothic altar, splendidly encumbered with shrines and reliquaries, that heavy marble sarcophagus, with angels' heads and clouds, which seems a specimen pillaged from the Val-de-Grâce or the Invalides?
"Indeed!" said the stranger, looking upon him with the curiosity of a naturalist studying some out-of-the-way specimen.
He told me it was a fine specimen of Robinsoniana, or something dreadful of that kind.