spectral

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spec·tral

 (spĕk′trəl)
adj.
1. Of or resembling a specter; ghostly.
2. Of, relating to, or produced by a spectrum.

spec·tral′i·ty (-trăl′ĭ-tē), spec′tral·ness (-trəl-nĭs) n.
spec′tral·ly adv.

spectral

(ˈspɛktrəl)
adj
1. of or like a spectre
2. (General Physics) of or relating to a spectrum: spectral colours.
3. (General Physics) physics (of a physical quantity) relating to a single wavelength of radiation: spectral luminous efficiency.
spectrality, ˈspectralness n
ˈspectrally adv

spec•tral

(ˈspɛk trəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a specter; ghostly.
2. resembling a specter.
3. of, pertaining to, or produced by a spectrum or spectra.
4. resembling or suggesting a spectrum or spectra.
[1710–20; < Latin spectr(um) (see specter) + -al1]
spec′tral•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.spectral - of or relating to a spectrum; "spectral colors"; "spectral analysis"
2.spectral - resembling or characteristic of a phantom; "a ghostly face at the window"; "a phantasmal presence in the room"; "spectral emanations"; "spiritual tappings at a seance"
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"

spectral

adjective ghostly, unearthly, eerie, supernatural, weird, phantom, shadowy, uncanny, spooky (informal), insubstantial, incorporeal, wraithlike the spectral quality of the light

spectral

adjective
Gruesomely suggestive of ghosts or death:
Translations
spektrální
aavemainen
spectral

spectral

[ˈspektrəl] ADJespectral

spectral

adj
(of ghosts)geisterhaft, gespenstisch
(of the spectrum)spektral, Spektral-; spectral colourSpektralfarbe f

spectral

[ˈspɛktrəl] adj (liter) (ghostly) → spettrale
References in periodicals archive ?
She argues that by uniting flesh and spirit, the specimen-solder epitomized the ideal love object Whitman conjured throughout Leaves of Grass--not yet a corpse, but already something beyond human, a creature all the more treasured for his ephemerality and spectrality.
Furthermore, childhood as spectrality and as the necessary supplement of the political proper--the child's status as the overtly exposed, sacrificial scapegoat, the hypervisible but silenced tlipside of sovereign powers (167-71)--does not merely point to "utopianism" and liminality.
The highest form of ideology does not reside in getting caught in ideological spectrality, forgetting about its foundation in real people and their relations, but precisely in overlooking this Real of spectrality and in pretending to address 'real people with their real worries" (Zizek, 2008a: 13).
Deconstruction involves explorations of the surprising, indeed incalculable effects of all kinds of virus and parasite, foreign body, supplement, borders and margins, spectrality and haunting.
Haunting and Spectrality in Neo-Victorian Fiction: Possessing the Past.
Indeed, the diffuse rhetoric of spectrality may be said to pervade all aspects of narration in the novel.
To the best of my knowledge, there are just two clear instances of spectrality in Galloway's short fiction, both from her first collection Blood (1991): namely, "Scenes from the Life No.
These aspects can be graphically illustrated in the works of Shakespeare and Poe through the figure of the ghost, a simultaneous presence and absence shifting in time "from narrative device to spectrality as literary trope and a critical tool" (Berthin 2010: 1), rendering the uncanny textuality in quests of ever-deferring signification, a shift that was particularly favored by the Gothic tradition.
A traditional scholar does not believe in ghosts--nor in all that could be called the virtual space of spectrality.
Unlike The Jazz Singer, which crosses heritage--"the cry of my race"--and practices--Jakie's cantorial acumen--for a proper identification of Jewishness (despite the spectrality of that heritage, regardless of how perfectly those practices map onto American popular entertainment), Gentleman's Agreement presumes no such differential predicates.
First, and notwithstanding the claim made by Michelle Weinroth, I do not find the "logic" of spectrality borrowed from Derrida to be a very convincing move, and I am inclined to think that neither do the essayists because, for the most part, they make little or no use of the idea.