sped


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Related to sped: speed

sped

 (spĕd)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of speed.

sped

(spɛd)
vb
a past tense and past participle of speed

speed

(spid)

n., v. sped speed•ed, speed•ing. n.
1. rapidity in moving, traveling, performing, etc.; swiftness.
2. relative rate of motion or progress: the speed of light.
3. a gear ratio in a motor vehicle or bicycle.
4.
a. the sensitivity of a photographic film or paper to light.
b. the length of time a shutter is opened to expose film.
c. the largest opening at which a lens can be used.
5. Slang. a stimulating drug, esp. methamphetamine or amphetamine.
6. a person, thing, activity, etc., that suits one's ability, inclinations, or personality: Quiet, easygoing people are more my speed.
7. Archaic. success or prosperity.
v.t.
8. to promote the success of; further, forward, or expedite.
9. to direct (the course, way, etc.) with speed.
10. to increase the rate of speed of (usu. fol. by up): to speed up production.
11. to cause to move or go with speed.
12. Archaic. to cause to succeed or prosper.
v.i.
13. to go or proceed with rapidity.
14. to drive a vehicle at a rate that exceeds the legal limit.
15. to increase the rate of speed (usu. fol. by up).
16. to get on or fare in a specified or particular manner.
17. Archaic. to succeed or prosper.
Idioms:
1. at full or top speed,
a. at the greatest speed possible.
b. to the maximum of one's capabilities.
2. up to speed,
a. operating at full or optimum speed.
b. functioning at an anticipated or competitive level: a new firm not yet up to speed.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English spede good luck, prosperity, rapidity, Old English spēd, c. Old Saxon spōd, Old High German spuot]
speed′er, n.
syn: speed, velocity, celerity refer to swift or energetic movement or operation. speed may apply to human or nonhuman activity; it emphasizes the rate in time at which something travels or operates: the speed of an automobile; the speed of thought. velocity, a more technical term, is commonly used to refer to high rates of speed: the velocity of a projectile. celerity, a somewhat literary term, usu. refers to human movement or operation, and emphasizes dispatch or economy in an activity: the celerity of his response.
References in classic literature ?
Long did the three friends look without speaking, though united in heart, while the projectile sped onward with an ever-decreasing speed.