speech balloon


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speech balloon

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Ariel Endaya posted a photo of Duterte relaxing in a swimming pool with a speech balloon saying, 'What's wrong with my nap?'
Smith adds to this jetsam lodged in the strata of paint by infiltrating the imagery of consumer culture: Fashion-label logos, a comic-book speech balloon, generic decal icons and temporary tattoos, smiley faces, a contorted plastic straw, a melting grass-green Popsicle, and red lipstick stains the paintings like leaky detritus.
Take this comic book: "Don't move!" screams a masked man in his speech balloon. In the next panel, a big gun points inches away from the bug-eyed faces of two migrant children.
The oddness of English idiom is treated in 'Speech Balloon', where the ubiquitous use of the phrase 'Over the Moon' becomes a thing of wonder, and then reappears most movingly in 'I Swear', in which a young woman who 'turned up from Bombay/too prissy to be rude' is taught vulgar idioms which echo in her mind after the man, who made them both laugh by teaching her, is gone.
Join the conversation on our Facebook page face com/poolecho By the afternoon, the wall near Harry's barbers, across from Henry Bohn Books, was covered with a 10ft picture of the dog and a speech balloon saying: "They didn't want me any more because I'm too old."
If you were to give it a speech balloon, what would it say?
Having uttered his lie, Doug-Dennis' speech balloon lifts him into the sky where ...
The accompanying speech balloon, which alternately appeared in Hebrew, Russian, and English, was a reference to the skewered meat: "Cooking methods in Israel are quite primitiveC*".
A cartoonlike speech balloon of BeethovenAAEs music, a painterAAEs palette, a pot of gold, a couple of skeletons and a Cupid-like archer complete the bizarre scene.
Rendered in a black and white scratchboard technique, evocative of the German Expressionists and the picture novels of Lynd Ward, Otto Nuckel and Frans Masereel in the 1920s and 1930s, the first panel includes a vintage photograph of 10-year-old Artie posing with his mother in a bathing suit, which segues into a drawn self-portrait of a gaunt Spiegelman in prison garb (referring to his brief stay as a teenager in a state mental hospital) with the speech balloon: "In 1968 my mother killed herself ...
So I prefer to write a one-word speech balloon on the thing and make it clear."