spherical


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spher·i·cal

 (sfîr′ĭ-kəl, sfĕr′-) also spher·ic (-ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Having the shape of a sphere; globular.
b. Having a shape approximating that of a sphere.
2. Of or relating to a sphere.
3. Of or relating to celestial bodies.

spher′i·cal·ly adv.
spher′i·cal·ness n.

spherical

(ˈsfɛrɪkəl) or

spheric

adj
1. shaped like a sphere
2. (Mathematics) of or relating to a sphere: spherical geometry.
3. (Mathematics) geometry formed on the surface of or inside a sphere: a spherical triangle.
4. (Astronomy)
a. of or relating to heavenly bodies
b. of or relating to the spheres of the Ptolemaic or the Copernican system
ˈspherically adv
ˈsphericalness n

spher•i•cal

(ˈsfɛr ɪ kəl, ˈsfɪər-)

also spher′ic,



adj.
1. having the form of a sphere; globular.
2. formed in or on a sphere, as a figure.
3. pertaining to a sphere or spheres.
4. pertaining to the heavenly bodies regarded astrologically as influencing human affairs.
[1515–25; < Late Latin sphēric(us) (< Greek sphairikós; see sphere, -ic) + -al1]
spher`i•cal′i•ty, n.
spher′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.spherical - of or relating to spheres or resembling a sphere; "spherical geometry"
nonspherical - not spherical
2.spherical - having the shape of a sphere or ballspherical - having the shape of a sphere or ball; "a spherical object"; "nearly orbicular in shape"; "little globular houses like mud-wasp nests"- Zane Grey
circular, round - having a circular shape

spherical

adjective round, globular, globe-shaped, rotund, orbicular purple and gold spherical earrings

spherical

adjective
Having the shape of a curve everywhere equidistant from a fixed point:
Translations
كُرَوي
kulovitýkulový
kuglerund
pallomainenpyöreä
gömbölyû
hnöttóttur
sfärisk

spherical

[ˈsferɪkəl] ADJesférico

spherical

[ˈsfɛrɪkəl] adjsphérique

spherical

adj (in shape) → kugelförmig, (kugel)rund; (Math, Astron) → sphärisch

spherical

[ˈsfɛrɪkl] adjsferico/a

sphere

(sfiə) noun
a solid object with a surface on which all points are an equal distance from the centre, like eg most types of ball.
spherical (ˈsferikəl) adjective
completely round, like a ball. It is now known that the world is not flat, but spherical; a spherical object.

spherical

a. esférico-a, rel. a una esfera.
References in classic literature ?
Substitute for your spherical shell a cylindro-conical projectile.
Before again issuing from it, this spiral runs into a small cone with a concave base, that is turned downward in the shape of a spherical cap.
After a sufficient quantity has thus been collected, the oil undergoes a purifying process, and is then poured into the small spherical shells of the nuts of the moo-tree, which are hollowed out to receive it.
This fluid mass comprises two billions two hundred and fifty millions of cubic miles, forming a spherical body of a diameter of sixty leagues, the weight of which would be three quintillions of tons.
This fish, with its flabby skin, is well known to possess the singular power of distending itself into a nearly spherical form.
Her kind believed that in the center of all-pervading solidity there was a single, vast, spherical cavity, which was Pellucidar.
There also I have found, in considerable quantities, curious balls, composed apparently of fine grass or roots, of pipewort perhaps, from half an inch to four inches in diameter, and perfectly spherical.
Then, according to physics, what happens is that a spherical wave of light travels outward from the star through space, just as, when you drop a stone into a stagnant pond, ripples travel outward from the place where the stone hit the water.
It were difficult to describe the shape or colours of this extraordinary substance, except to say, in general terms, that it was nearly spherical, and exhibited all the hues of the rainbow, intermingled without reference to harmony, and without any very ostensible design.
Large trees had been chopped down fifteen or twenty feet above the ground, and upon the tops of them spherical habitations of woven twigs, mud covered, had been built.
To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree.
When the sea is moderately calm, and slightly marked with spherical ripples, and this gnomon-like fin stands up and casts shadows upon the wrinkled surface, it may well be supposed that the watery circle surrounding it somewhat resembles a dial, with its style and wavy hour-lines graved on it.