spherule

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spher·ule

 (sfîr′o͞ol, -yo͞ol, sfĕr′-)
n.
A miniature sphere; a globule.

[Late Latin sphaerula, diminutive of Latin sphaera, ball; see sphere.]

spher′u·lar (sfîr′yə-lər, sfĕr′-) adj.

spherule

(ˈsfɛruːl)
n
a very small sphere or globule
[C17: from Late Latin sphaerula a little sphere]
ˈspherular adj

spher•ule

(ˈsfɛr ul, -yul, ˈsfɪər-)

n.
a small sphere or spherical body.
[1655–65]
spher′u•lar (-yʊ lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spherule - a small sphere
globe, orb, ball - an object with a spherical shape; "a ball of fire"
Translations

spher·ule

n. esfera diminuta.
References in periodicals archive ?
"No matter what the exact chemistry of these spherules was to start, the fact that they're there tells us [that] a lot of liquid water moved through these rocks over time," Briony Horgan, a planetary scientist at Purdue University in Indiana, said during an (https://www.space.com/42645-mars-blueberries-formation-mystery-earth-analogs.html) interview . 
(1,38) Both are caused by fungi that grow as spore producing hyphae at environmental temperatures, but as yeasts (spherules or ellipses) at body temperature within the lungs.
The most common form of C immitis seen in biological specimens is variably sized (20-200 pm), thick-walled mature spherules containing numerous endospores ranging from 2 to 5 [micro]m (Figure 16).
Inagaki, Formation of carbon spherules by pressure carbonization-Relation to molecular structure of precursor, Carbon, 26, 303 (1988).
Histopathology examination revealed that the abscess was pyogranulomatous, with visible fungal spherules morphologically consistent with Coccidioides spp.
The pathology report also confirmed to be positive for Coccidioides spherules (Figures 1 and 2).
The fungal conidia were round structures approximately 30-40 micrometers in diameter with 2 micrometers of thick pale basophilic cell walls and heterogeneous amorphous pale amphophilic central material, consistent with immature Coccidioides immitis spherules (Figure 1).
The agents used for this purpose are as follows: sclerosing agents (Fibrin glue, Tetrasycline, Hidrocloric acide, Microporous Polysaccharide spherules, Iodized talc), anti-inflammatory drugs (Acetyl salicylic acid, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), chemotherapeutic agents (Fluorouracil, Mytomycin-C) and radiotherapy.
Histiocytes containing laminated calcified spherules, commonly known as Michaelis-Gutmann (MG) bodies, were also seen (fig-1).
Histo-pathologic analyses demonstrated necrotizing granulomatous reaction, rare spherules and multinucleated giant cells (Figures 6-8).
When inhaled into the warm lungs of a mammalian host (37[degrees]C), these infectious propagules convert into pathogenic yeast (or spherules for Coccidioides) to cause pneumonia [1].