spina

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spina

(ˈspaɪnə)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy the spine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

spi·na

n. spina, espina.
1. protuberancia en forma de espina;
2. la espina o columna vertebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Erector spinae plane (ESP) block was first described by Forero et al.
The probe was located 3 cm lateral to T1 spinous process in longitudinal parasagittal orientation and the scan from T1 to T5 revealed the erector spinae, rhomboid major and trapezius muscles posterior and superficial to the transverse processes.
Although the mechanism of analgesic efficacy of ESP block remains unclear, previous cadaver models have demonstrated that deposition of local anaesthetic deep (anterior) to the erector spinae muscle reaches the paravertebral space through connective tissues and ligaments (4).
The Erector Spinae Plane Block: A Novel Analgesic Technique in Thoracic Neuropathic Pain.
Methods and Measures: sEMG was examined by cervical-brachial eight muscles (erector spinae neck, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, anterior deltoid, middle deltoid and latissimus dorsi) of the right shoulder of 16 subjects (8 men and 8 women).
Results: The results of the 8 muscles studied muscle activation during the test was statistically significant for the infraspinatus (p = .020) and erector spinae muscle of the neck (p = .050) in the crawl, and the erector spinae of the neck (p = .020) in front crawl swimming.
When we faced the same muscle in front of the tube placement or not crawling, we see that the infraspinatus muscle and the erector spinae of the neck are the only ones that have statistically significant changes in muscle activation due to the suppression of head movement (erector spinae) and resistance underwater recovery phase (infraspinatus) As the underwater recovery by the application of the tube causes the neck muscles are less active.
From a biomechanical perspective, lumbar posture during lifting and lowering is important because as the lumbar spine flexes it undergoes a change in configuration that influences the role played by the passive tissues of the spine and the active contribution of the erector spinae. For example, high levels of lumbar flexion have been associated with increased ligamentous and lumbar disc loading, and elevated anterior shear forces (Adams and Dolan 1996, Arjmand et al 2011, McGill 1997, Potvin et al 1991).
discs and ligaments) and active (the erector spinae) subsystems of the spine during lifting and lowering has important implications for postural education and exercise prescription when dealing with clients who are actively involved in manual handling tasks.
Hence, the aim of this clinical commentary is to discuss some of the biomechanical principles associated with lumbar posture, spinal loading, and erector spinae muscle activity and highlight the implications for the education and the rehabilitation of those involved in manual handling activities.
* Machine Deadlift (gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, erector spinae)
* Hip Extension (hamstrings, gluteals, erector spinae)