spinifex


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spi·ni·fex

 (spī′nə-fĕks′)
n.
Any of various clump-forming, perennial Australian grasses, chiefly of the genus Triodia, growing in arid regions and having awl-shaped, pointed leaves.

[New Latin Spīnifex, former genus name : Latin spīna, thorn + Latin -fex; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

spinifex

(ˈspɪnɪˌfɛks)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: porcupine grass Austral any of various coarse spiny-leaved inland grasses of the genus Triodia
2. (Plants) any grass of the SE Asian genus Spinifex, having pointed leaves and spiny seed heads: often planted to bind loose sand
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin spīna a thorn + -fex maker, from facere to make]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sending Gibson off to look for help, Giles was soon reduced to crawling, his skin a mass of sores from the spinifex thorns and his head light from hunger and thirst.
They range from daisies whose seeds lie dormant for years before germinating in winter rains, yet holding some seed back for decades as an insurance policy; to multiple lizard species that share resources in a single spinifex clump by foraging at different times of the day; to nomadic humans that build strong community ties, yet move readily when the going gets tough; and the adaptability of desert businesses and agricultural enterprises.
They describe the topography of anthills, mountain ranges, tumbling tracts of spinifex and rocky protuberances that spring from the red desert soil.
Running barefoot through the sharp spinifex grass, Byron is the last to make a kill, crash-tackling his victim on the ground.
Site Location/environment W3-03 On flat featureless rhyolite plain, spinifex, gasses, east of existing HI rail line, artefact scatter focused around small gilgais W3-04 On flat featureless rhyolite plain, spinifex.
North Melbourne: Spinifex Press (by arrangement with Zed Books), 2009, 144 pp.
Pluto Press, London, New York; and Spinifex Press, North Melbourne, pp.
She is also a novelist, aerialist, and Publisher at Spinifex Press.
(2.) de Ishtar, Zohl, 1994, Daughters of the Pacific, Spinifex Press: Melbourne.
Holding Yawulyu: White Culture and Black Women's Law, Zohl de Ishtar, Spinifex Press, 2005
Currently undervalued--in my opinion--are works from the Spinifex People of western Australia; the bark-painting community at Maningrida; and Ngukurr, where the justified fame of Ginger Riley has rather eclipsed other artists, such as Sambo Burra Burra, Amy Johnson and Gertie Huddleston (Fig.
This entry is also one of several candidates that would have benefited from an illustration, along with Spinifex and the routes of some of the major expeditions.