spinney


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Related to spinney: Spinny

spin·ney

 (spĭn′ē)
n. pl. spin·neys Chiefly British
A small grove; a copse.

[Obsolete French espinoi, from Old French espinei, thorny place, from Vulgar Latin *spīnēta, pl. of Latin spīnētum, thorn hedge, from spīna, thorn.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spinney

(ˈspɪnɪ)
n
(Forestry) chiefly Brit a small wood or copse
[C16: from Old French espinei, from espine thorn, from Latin spīna]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spin•ney

(ˈspɪn i)

n., pl. -neys. Brit.
a small wood or thicket.
[1300–50; < Middle French espinei place full of thorns, derivative of espine spine]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spinney - a copse that shelters game
brush, coppice, copse, thicket, brushwood - a dense growth of bushes
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

spinney

noun copse, thicket, coppice, holt A spinney of thorn hung on the craggy edge of the hill.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

spinney

[ˈspɪnɪ] Nbosquecillo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

spinney

[ˈspɪni] n (British) (= copse) → bosquet m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

spinney

n (Brit) → Dickicht nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

spinney

[ˈspɪnɪ] nboschetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Come and look for violets with me in the spinney, and let us talk of the houses we are going to build, and the dreams we shall dream in them."
Never had his gold been so golden, his azure so dazzlingly clear and deep as on this particular May morning; while his fancy simply ran riot in the marginal decorations of woodland and spinney, quaint embroidered flowers and copses full of exquisitely painted and wonderfully trained birds of song.
And they went on in silence through Kirton hamlet, where an old man followed them with his eyes, and perhaps envied them their youth and love; and across the Ivy beck where the mill was splashing and grumbling low thunder to itself in the chequered shadow of the dell, and the miller before the door was beating flour from his hands as he whistled a modulation; and up by the high spinney, whence they saw the mountains upon either hand; and down the hill again to the back courts and offices of Naseby House.
Meanwhile, Sir Huddlestone has hoisted himself unwieldily on the Nob: "Let's try Sowster's Spinney, Tom," says the Baronet, "Farmer Mangle tells me there are two foxes in it." Tom blows his horn and trots off, followed by the pack, by the whips, by the young gents from Winchester, by the farmers of the neighbourhood, by the labourers of the parish on foot, with whom the day is a great holiday, Sir Huddlestone bringing up the rear with Colonel Crawley, and the whole cortege disappears down the avenue.
As I said, the Great Western now runs right through it, and it is a land of large, rich pastures bounded by ox-fences, and covered with fine hedgerow timber, with here and there a nice little gorse or spinney, where abideth poor Charley, having no other cover to which to betake himself for miles and miles, when pushed out some fine November morning by the old Berkshire.
The prisoner, on the contrary, was at that time at a lonely spot called Marston's Spinney, where he had been summoned by an anonymous note, couched in blackmailing terms, and threatening to reveal certain matters to his wife unless he complied with its demands.
And through the charred and desolated area--perhaps twenty square miles altogether--that encircled the Martian encamp- ment on Horsell Common, through charred and ruined villages among the green trees, through the blackened and smoking arcades that had been but a day ago pine spinneys, crawled the devoted scouts with the heliographs that were presently to warn the gunners of the Martian approach.
The Spinney is a six bedroom family home on Fulbrook Lane - in between Warwick and Stratford.
SPINNEY Motorhomes & Caravans has officially taking over Flintshire Caravan Sales, in Queensferry, with the new signs being erected this week.
SPINNEY Motorhomes & Caravans has officially taking over Flintshire Caravan Sales in Queensferry with the new signs being erected this week.
Caroll Spinney announced in a statement Wednesday that he's handing over Big Bird and his other character, Oscar the Grouch, to younger performers.
Puppeteer Caroll Spinney, who also plays Oscar the Grouch, has hand-picked his successors to play the two roles -- after mentoring them for more than two decades.