spinning


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

spin·ning

 (spĭn′ĭng)
n.
1. The process of making fibrous material into yarn or thread.
2. The act of fishing with a light rod and a reel having a bail or similar device that guides the line around a stationary spool and that can be disengaged to let the line run freely, as when casting. Also called spin casting, spin fishing.

spinning

(ˈspɪnɪŋ)
n
1. (Textiles)
a. the act or process of spinning
b. (as modifier): spinning yarn.
2. (Angling) the act or technique of casting and drawing a revolving lure through the water so as to imitate the movement of a live fish, etc

Spinning

(ˈspɪnɪŋ)
n
(Team Sports, other than specified) trademark a form of high-intensity exercise using exercise bikes

spin•ning

(ˈspɪn ɪŋ)

n.
1.
a. the act or process of twisting fibers, as cotton or rayon, into yarn or thread.
b. the extrusion of a fiber-forming solution through a spinneret to form filaments.
2. the act or process of secreting and placing silk or silklike filaments, as in the construction of a web by a spider or the formation of a cocoon by a caterpillar.
3. Also called spin casting, spin fishing. the act or technique of fishing with a spinning reel and rod.
[1250–1300]

spinning

  • heckle - First a "flax comb" for splitting and straightening the fibers for spinning; its metaphorical sense developed from its verb form, "to mangle by cutting, to cut roughly."
  • distaff side, spear side - The female side of a family is the distaff side—the distaff being a stick used for holding yarn when spinning; the male side is the spear side.
  • fouette - A spectacular pirouette in which the ballerina whips her raised leg around in an eggbeater motion while spinning on the other leg.
  • turngiddy - Means dizzy from spinning around.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spinning - creating threadspinning - creating thread      
handicraft - a craft that requires skillful hands
Translations

spinning

[ˈspɪnɪŋ]
A. N (= act) → hilado m; (= art) → hilandería f, arte m de hilar
B. CPD spinning jenny Nmáquina f de hilar de husos múltiples
spinning mill Nhilandería f
spinning top Npeonza f, trompo m
spinning wheel Nrueca f or torno m de hilar

spinning

[ˈspɪnɪŋ] n [thread] (by hand)filage m; (by machine)filature fspinning top ntoupie fspinning wheel nrouet mspin-off n
(= unexpected benefit) → avantage m inattendu (= by-product) → sous-produit m

spinning

nSpinnen nt

spinning

in cpdsSpinn-;
spinning jenny
nJennymaschine f
spinning mill
nSpinnerei f
spinning top
nKreisel m
spinning wheel
nSpinnrad nt
spinning works
n sing or plSpinnerei f, → Spinnstofffabrik f

spinning

[ˈspɪnɪŋ] nfilatura
References in classic literature ?
Each in his turn went up to the priest (they were all within a large circular railing) and bowed profoundly and then went spinning away deliriously and took his appointed place in the circle, and continued to spin.
To all appearance Molly had got through her after-dinner work in an exemplary manner, had "cleaned herself" with great dispatch, and now came to ask, submissively, if she should sit down to her spinning till milking time.
It isn't spinning as you'd be at, I'll be bound, and let you have your own way.
I am a nun from the Spinning Convent,[10] and my mother when she died left me this apple.
As soon as the King's son saw the old Abbess spinning he threw himself at her feet and entreated her to tell him how he could kill the Seven-headed Serpent.
In the door there was a golden key, and when she turned it the door sprang open, and there sat an old lady spinning away very busily.
It was then that the ecstasy and the dream began, in which emotion was the matter of the universe, and matter but an adventitious intrusion likely to hinder you from spinning where you wanted to spin.
One evening I was spinning on my wheel, there comes a knock at my door; I ask who it is.
But can you sing standing on your head, with a top spinning on your left foot, and a sabre balanced on your right?
Then she went to the ugly brown spiders, and in gentle words told them, how in Fairy Land their kindred spun all the elfin cloth, and in return the Fairies gave them food, and then how happily they lived among the green leaves, spinning garments for their neigbbors.
At the same time, the schooner began to turn upon her heel, spinning slowly, end for end, across the current.
At these words her mother Teresa Panza came out spinning a bundle of flax, in a grey petticoat (so short was it one would have fancied "they to her shame had cut it short"), a grey bodice of the same stuff, and a smock.