spiralist

spiralist

(ˈspaɪərəlɪst) sociol
n
(Sociology) a person or thing that ascends in a spiral structure
adj
(Sociology) relating to spiralism
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Pristionchus Bursaphelechus clusters elegans pacificus xylophilus Lysozymes 3 15 14 14 Antimicrobial 0 11 0 0 caenacins Caenopores or 9 23 6 2 saposin-like Neuropeptide-like 18 47 9 10 proteins (NLPs) Thaumatins (THNs) 1 8 1 1 Defensin-like ABF 2 6 3 0 proteins C type lectin 34 265 66 4 domain-containing proteins (CTLD) Immune effector Steinernema Brugia Ascaris Trichinella carpocapsae malayi suum spiralist [dagger] [dagger] Lysozymes 8 2 2 0 Antimicrobial 0 0 0 0 caenacins Caenopores or 7 1 4 1 saposin-like Neuropeptide-like 15 7 11 1 proteins (NLPs) Thaumatins (THNs) 1 0 0 0 Defensin-like ABF 0 0 5 0 proteins C type lectin 15 3 19 0 domain-containing proteins (CTLD) * For example, there are 265 C.
Thus, Glover might have positioned Spiralism as the latest temps fort in the historical development of a Haitian aesthetic of the narrative that has been consistently informed by the oral tradition, placing the Spiralist novel in a formal and ideological continuum that proceeds from the folktale to the lodyans to the marvelous realist narrative.
Indeed, as she herself acknowledges, her work stands on the foundation built by scholars who preceded her in the field, notably Jean Jonassaint (2008) who has studied with great critical insight and scholarly thoroughness the writings of the Spiralist novelist par excellence, Franketienne.
Following a panoramic preface contextualizing and synthesizing her study, Glover's theorizing of the Spiralist narrative arises organically, in five integrated parts, from her textual analysis of a selection of works by the three novelists: Franketienne's Mur a crever (1968), Ultravocal (1972), and Les Affres d'un defi (1979); Fignole's Lespossedes de lapleine lune (1987) and Aube tranquille (1990); and Philoctete's Le Peuple des terres melees (1989).
Glover's Haiti Unbound: A Spiralist Challenge to the Postcolonial Canon stands out as an insightful study of the Spiralist novel, the narrative fiction of three of Haiti's foremost contemporary writers: the now famous Franketienne and the lesser known Jean-Claude Fignole and Rene Philoctete.
Spiralist novels like the folkloric Les Possedes de la pleine lune, by Jean-Claude Fignole, which frequently digresses into legends and tales and in many ways qualifies as a frame-tale narrative, could provide readers with the antidote to both the misrepresentations of Haitian spirituality in our media and the distortions of journalism.
Ready to Burst is the artists first novel and a foundational text of the spiralist phenomenon in Haitian literature.
The Neoliberal University: Ascent of the Spiralists. Critical Sociology 42 (7-8): 941-42.