spiritous


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spir·it·ous

 (spĭr′ĭ-təs)
adj.
1. Spirituous.
2. Obsolete Highly refined; pure.

spiritous

(ˈspɪrɪtəs)
adj
(Chemistry) a variant of spirituous

spiritous

(ˈspɪrɪtəs)
adj
1. archaic high-spirited
2. archaic ethereal; pure
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.spiritous - containing or of the nature of alcohol; "spiritous beverages"; "spirituous liquors"
alcoholic - characteristic of or containing alcohol; "alcoholic drinks"
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References in classic literature ?
O ADAM, one Almightie is, from whom All things proceed, and up to him return, If not deprav'd from good, created all Such to perfection, one first matter all, Indu'd with various forms, various degrees Of substance, and in things that live, of life; But more refin'd, more spiritous, and pure, As neerer to him plac't or neerer tending Each in thir several active Sphears assignd, Till body up to spirit work, in bounds Proportiond to each kind.
Spiritous failed to confirm the form with that rival when third in a 6f novice event at Haydock next time, but he progressed well from that run to land a similar race at Newmarket in June.
This permission, however, does not extend to spiritous liquors.
All spiritous liquours are prohibited in Alberta; so they are sold on the sly only, but there was very little sly this night.
(15) The first DWI law in the nation originated in New York State in 1890--section 158 of the former Highway Law--which provided: "No person owning any carriage for the [conveyance] of passengers, running or traveling upon any highway or road, shall employ, or continue in employment, any person to drive such carriage, who is addicted to drunkeness, or to the excessive use of spiritous liquor...." (16)
Watts's sham symbolism which, for expediency's sake, transforms Modesty into Maternity, is laughable (FR 66), particularly because he then transposes a letter arguing against "spiritous liquors" onto the figures of Mammon and Maternity, concluding that:
Section 20 of the Trade and Intercourse Act of June 30, 1834, made it a crime to "sell, exchange, give, barter, or dispose of any spiritous liquor or wine to an Indian (in the Indian Country)" or "to introduce, or attempt to introduce, any spiritous liquor or wine into the Indian Country)" except as required by the War Department.
(32) Any inmate who infringed this rule by introducing spiritous or fermented liquors was likely to be subjected to immediate discharge.
(38.) Temperance/Prohibition were initially aimed principally at the spiritous liquors, but eventually came to include beer as well, since many of the social ills for which liquor was to blame were also linked to the drinking places--taverns and saloons in which beer, along with the harder drinks, was consumed in large quantities.
Some, I hear, make a spiritous drink with them, which they disguise under such names as 'cherry-bounce.' The common way of gathering them is to shake them down upon sheets spread beneath the tree.
I never saw him taste or drink a drop of any kind of spiritous liquors[.]" (22) It is clear that Lincoln made quite a memorable impression on Robert Rutledge.