spit

(redirected from spitting in the face)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

spit 1

 (spĭt)
n.
1. Saliva, especially when expectorated; spittle.
2. The act of expectorating.
3. Something, such as the frothy secretion of spittle bugs, that resembles spit.
4. A brief, scattered rainfall or snowfall.
5. Informal The perfect likeness: He's the spit and image of his father.
v. spat (spăt) or spit, spit·ting, spits
v.tr.
1. To eject from the mouth: spat out the grape seeds.
2. To eject as if from the mouth: a fire spitting sparks.
3. To emit suddenly and forcefully: spat out an insult.
v.intr.
1. To eject matter from the mouth; expectorate.
2. To express contempt or animosity, especially by ejecting matter from the mouth.
3. To make a hissing or sputtering noise: french fries spitting in the pan.
4. To rain or snow in light, scattered drops or flakes.
Phrasal Verb:
spit up
To vomit. Used especially of a baby.

[Middle English, from spitten, to spit, from Old English spittan, ultimately of imitative origin.]

spit 2

 (spĭt)
n.
1. A slender, pointed rod on which meat is impaled for roasting.
2. A narrow point of land extending into a body of water.
tr.v. spit·ted, spit·ting, spits
To impale on or as if on a spit.

[Middle English, from Old English spitu.]

spit

(spɪt)
vb, spits, spitting, spat or spit
1. (Physiology) (intr) to expel saliva from the mouth; expectorate
2. (intr) informal to show disdain or hatred by spitting
3. (of a fire, hot fat, etc) to eject (fragments of coal, sparks, etc) violently and with an explosive sound; splutter
4. (Physical Geography) (intr) to rain very lightly
5. (Physiology) (often foll by: out) to eject or discharge (something) from the mouth: he spat the food out; to spit blood.
6. (often foll by: out) to utter (short sharp words or syllables), esp in a violent manner
7. spit chips slang Austral to be very angry. Also (NZ): spit tacks
8. spit it out! informal Brit a command given to someone that he should speak forthwith
n
9. (Zoology) another name for spittle
10. (Physical Geography) a light or brief fall of rain, snow, etc
11. (Physiology) the act or an instance of spitting
12. informal chiefly Brit another word for spitting image
[Old English spittan; related to spǣtan to spit, German dialect spitzen]
ˈspitter n

spit

(spɪt)
n
1. (Cookery) a pointed rod on which meat is skewered and roasted before or over an open fire
2. (Cookery) Also called: rotisserie or rotating spit a similar device rotated by electricity or clockwork, fitted onto a cooker
3. (Physical Geography) an elongated often hooked strip of sand or shingle projecting from the shore, deposited by longshore drift, and usually above water
vb, spits, spitting or spitted
(tr) to impale on or transfix with or as if with a spit
[Old English spitu; related to Old High German spiz spit, Norwegian spit tip]

spit

(spɪt)
n
(Agriculture) the depth of earth cut by a spade; a spade's depth
[C16: from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German spit]

spit1

(spɪt)

v. spit spat, spit•ting, v.i.
1. to eject saliva from the mouth; expectorate.
2. to sputter: grease spitting in the fire.
v.t.
3. to eject from the mouth: to spit watermelon seeds.
4. to throw out or emit like saliva.
5. spit up, to vomit; throw up.
n.
6. saliva, esp. when ejected.
7. the act of spitting.
Idioms:
spit and image, exact likeness. Also, spitting image.
[before 950; (v.) Middle English spitten, Old English spittan, c. dial. German spützen to spit]

spit2

(spɪt)

n., v. spit•ted, spit•ting. n.
1. a pointed rod for skewering and holding meat over a fire or other source of heat.
2. any of various rods, pins, etc.
3. a narrow point of land projecting into the water.
4. a long, narrow shoal extending from the shore.
v.t.
5. to pierce, stab, or transfix with or as if with a spit; impale on something sharp.
[before 1000; Middle English spite, Old English spitu, c. Middle Dutch, spit, Old High German spiz spit]

spit


Past participle: spit
Gerund: spitting

Imperative
spit
spit
Present
I spit
you spit
he/she/it spits
we spit
you spit
they spit
Preterite
I spat
you spat
he/she/it spat
we spat
you spat
they spat
Present Continuous
I am spitting
you are spitting
he/she/it is spitting
we are spitting
you are spitting
they are spitting
Present Perfect
I have spit
you have spit
he/she/it has spit
we have spit
you have spit
they have spit
Past Continuous
I was spitting
you were spitting
he/she/it was spitting
we were spitting
you were spitting
they were spitting
Past Perfect
I had spit
you had spit
he/she/it had spit
we had spit
you had spit
they had spit
Future
I will spit
you will spit
he/she/it will spit
we will spit
you will spit
they will spit
Future Perfect
I will have spit
you will have spit
he/she/it will have spit
we will have spit
you will have spit
they will have spit
Future Continuous
I will be spitting
you will be spitting
he/she/it will be spitting
we will be spitting
you will be spitting
they will be spitting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been spitting
you have been spitting
he/she/it has been spitting
we have been spitting
you have been spitting
they have been spitting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been spitting
you will have been spitting
he/she/it will have been spitting
we will have been spitting
you will have been spitting
they will have been spitting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been spitting
you had been spitting
he/she/it had been spitting
we had been spitting
you had been spitting
they had been spitting
Conditional
I would spit
you would spit
he/she/it would spit
we would spit
you would spit
they would spit
Past Conditional
I would have spit
you would have spit
he/she/it would have spit
we would have spit
you would have spit
they would have spit

spit

1. A low strip of sand or shingle, one end joined to land, the other poking into the sea or across a bay.
2. The depth of a spade’s blade, usually about 10 inches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spit - a narrow strip of land that juts out into the seaspit - a narrow strip of land that juts out into the sea
cape, ness - a strip of land projecting into a body of water
sand - a loose material consisting of grains of rock or coral
2.spit - a clear liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands of the mouthspit - a clear liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands of the mouth; moistens the mouth and starts the digestion of starches
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
slobber, dribble, drivel, drool - saliva spilling from the mouth
tobacco juice - saliva colored brown by tobacco (snuff or chewing tobacco)
salivary gland - any of three pairs of glands in the mouth and digestive system that secrete saliva for digestion
ptyalin - an amylase secreted in saliva
3.spit - a skewer for holding meat over a fire
brochette - a small spit or skewer
rack, stand - a support for displaying various articles; "the newspapers were arranged on a rack"
skewer - a long pin for holding meat in position while it is being roasted
turnspit - a roasting spit that can be turned
4.spit - the act of spitting (forcefully expelling saliva)spit - the act of spitting (forcefully expelling saliva)
ejection, forcing out, expulsion, projection - the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
Verb1.spit - expel or eject (saliva or phlegm or sputum) from the mouth; "The father of the victim spat at the alleged murderer"
cough out, cough up, expectorate, spit up, spit out - discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
cough out, cough up, expectorate, spit up, spit out - discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
cough up, pony up, spit up - give reluctantly; "He coughed up some money for his children's tuition"
2.spit - utter with anger or contempt
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
3.spit - rain gently; "It has only sprinkled, but the roads are slick"
rain, rain down - precipitate as rain; "If it rains much more, we can expect some flooding"
4.spit - drive a skewer through; "skewer the meat for the BBQ"
pin - pierce with a pin; "pin down the butterfly"

spit

1
verb
1. expectorate, gob (Brit. informal), sputter, hoick (Brit. informal) They spat at me and taunted me.
2. eject, discharge, throw out I spat it on to my plate.
3. sizzle, hiss, crackle, sputter the fire where pork chops were sizzling and spitting
4. snap, bark, snarl, say angrily, sputter, speak sharply `Get out of here,' he spat angrily.
5. rain lightly, drizzle, spot It will stop in a minute - it's only spitting.
noun
1. saliva, dribble, spittle, drool, slaver, sputum When he took a corner kick he was showered with spit.
within spitting distance close, near, beside, alongside, close by, just round the corner, within sniffing distance (informal), a hop, skip and a jump away (informal) a restaurant within spitting distance of the Tower of London

spit

2
noun rotisserie, skewer, brochette She roasted the meat on a spit.
Translations
بُصاقبُصَاقسَفّود، سيخ شَكيَبْصُقيَبْصِقُ
slinaplivatplivnoutplivnutírožeň
spytspyttespidsprøjtesprutte
kraĉi
sylkeäsylki
pljuvatiražanjpljuvačka
köp
hrækjamunnvatn, hrákispÿtasteikarteinn
つばつばを吐く
침을 뱉다
iesmssiekalasspļautsprakšķētsprēgāt
odpľuťpľuťvyprsknúť
pljunitislina
spottaspett
ถ่มน้ำลายน้ำลายที่ถ่มออก
nhổ nước bọtnước bọt

spit

1 [spɪt] (spat (vb: pt, pp))
A. Nsaliva f, esputo m
a few spits of rainunas gotas de lluvia
spit and polishlimpieza f
that table needs a bit of spit and polishesa mesa hay que limpiarla
to be the dead spit of sbser la viva imagen or el vivo retrato de algn
B. VT
1. (lit) [+ blood, crumb] → escupir
2. (= exclaim) → espetar, soltar
"traitor!" he spattraidor! -espetó or soltó él
he spat the wordsescupió las palabras
C. VI
1. [person] → escupir (at, on a en) [cat] → bufar
to spit in sb's faceescupir a la cara a algn
it's spitting with rain (Brit) → están cayendo algunas gotas
2. [fat, fire] → chisporrotear
the fish is spitting in the panchisporrotea el pescado en la sartén
spit forth VT + ADV = spit out
spit out VT + ADV
1. [+ pip, pill] → escupir
I spat it outlo escupí
2. (fig) spit it out!¡dilo!, ¡habla!
he spat out the wordsescupió las palabras
spit up VT + ADV [+ blood] → soltar un esputo de

spit

2 [spɪt]
A. N
1. (Culin) → asador m, espetón m
2. (Geog) [of land] → lengua f; (= sandbank) → banco m de arena
B. VTespetar
C. CPD spit roast Nasado m
see also spitroast

spit

3 [spɪt] N (Agr) → azadada f
to dig three spits deepexcavar a una profundidad de tres azadadas

spit

[ˈspɪt]
n
(for roasting)broche f
(= spittle) → crachat m (= saliva) → salive f
[land] → pointe f
vi [spat] (pt, pp)
[person, cat] → cracher
[fire] → crépiter; [frying food] → grésiller
(British) (= rain lightly) → pleuvioter
It's only spitting → Il pleuviote seulement.
vt
[+ blood, venom] → cracher
(= say angrily) [+ abuse, insults, curses] → cracher
spit out
vt sep
[+ gum, food] → cracher
(= say angrily) [+ words, insults] → cracher

spit

1 vb: pret, ptp <spat>
n
(= action)(Aus)spucken nt; (= saliva)Spucke f; there was just a spit of raines tröpfelte nur; to give something a bit of spit and polish (inf)etw wienern (inf); it needs a bit of spit and polish (inf)es müsste einmal tüchtig gewienert werden (inf); a spit and sawdust club (Brit inf) → eine (echte) Spelunke
(inf: = image) = spitting image
vtspucken, speien (geh)
vispucken, speien (geh); (fat)spritzen; (fire)zischen; (person: verbally, cat) → fauchen, zischen; to spit at somebodyjdn anspucken, jdn anspeien (geh), → jdn anfauchen, jdn anzischen; to spit in somebody’s face/eyejdm ins Gesicht spucken; (fig)auf jdn pfeifen (inf); it is spitting (with rain) (Brit) → es tröpfelt; she’s spitting in the wind if she thinks that’ll work (inf)da hat sie sich verrechnet, wenn sie denkt, dass das funktionieren wird; fighting the system is like spitting in the wind (inf)gegen das System anzukämpfen hat sowieso keine Wirkung

spit

2
n
(Cook) → (Brat)spieß m; on the spitam Spieß
(of land)Landzunge f
vt meat(auf-)spießen

spit

1 [spɪt] n (Culin) (for roasting) → spiedo; (of land) → lingua di terra

spit

2 [spɪt] (spat (vb: pt, pp))
1. n (spittle) → sputo; (saliva) → saliva
a bit of spit and polish (fam) → una bella lucidata
to be the dead spit of sb (fam) → essere il ritratto sputato di qn
2. vtsputare
3. vi to spit (at)sputare (addosso a); (cat) → soffiare (contro)
to spit on the ground → sputare per terra
it is spitting with rain → sta piovigginando
spit out vt + adv (sparks) → sprigionare; (fat) → schizzare
spit it out! (fam) (say it) → sputa il rospo!

spit1

(spit) noun
(also spittle (ˈspitl) ) the liquid that forms in the mouth.
verbpresent participle ˈspitting: past tense, past participle spat (spat)
1. to throw out (spit) from the mouth. He spat in the gutter as an indication of contempt.
2. to send (out) with force. The fire spat (out) sparks.

spit2

(spit) noun
a type of sharp-pointed metal bar on which meat is roasted.

spit

بُصَاق, يَبْصِقُ plivat, slina spyt, spytte Spucke, spucken φτύνω, φτύσιμο asador, escupir, espetón sylkeä, sylki bave, cracher pljuvačka, pljuvati sputare, sputo つば, つばを吐く, 침을 뱉다 speeksel, spuwen spytt, spytte plunąć, ślina cuspe, cuspir, cuspo плевать, слюна spett, spotta ถ่มน้ำลาย, น้ำลายที่ถ่มออก şiş, tükürmek nhổ nước bọt, nước bọt 吐痰, 唾液

spit

n. saliva, escupo;
v. escupir, expectorar.

spit

n saliva; vt, vi (pret & pp spat; ger spitting) escupir; to — (something) out escupir (algo); to — up (ped, fam) regurgitar, devolverse(le) (a uno) la comida (fam)
References in classic literature ?
When little Fanny came into the schoolroom, I hoped she would be mild and inoffensive, at least; but a few days, if not a few hours, sufficed to destroy the illusion: I found her a mischievous, intractable little creature, given up to falsehood and deception, young as she was, and alarmingly fond of exercising her two favourite weapons of offence and defence: that of spitting in the faces of those who incurred her displeasure, and bellowing like a bull when her unreasonable desires were not gratified.
The fact that this man felt that he was justified in spitting in the face of a pregnant woman is incomprehensible.
The Swans boss hit out after his players accused Rovers midfielder Richie Wellens of spitting in the face of Leon Britton late on in the first-half.