split ticket


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Related to split ticket: straight ticket

split ticket

n.
1. A ballot cast for candidates of two or more political parties.
2. A ticket that includes the names of candidates from more than one party.

split ticket

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) See split9 See also straight ticket

split′ tick′et


n.
a ballot on which not all votes have been cast for candidates of the same political party.
[1830–40, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.split ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for candidates from more than one party
balloting, vote, voting, ballot - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
straight ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for all the candidates of one party
References in periodicals archive ?
Other new features include a split ticket function, sales tax removal for visitors from states with no sales tax and a driver's license-scanning function to populate pertinent details for a wine club membership.
Booking exactly the same journey details with the split ticket company came out at PS30 and that did not include the tube fare between terminals in London which was included in the Virgin website quote.
The effect of the Australian ballot reform on split ticket voting: 1876-1908.
Inspired by policy concerns that have been mediated through a coordination-with-moderation mechanism, a small but significant proportion of voters have been motivated to vote a split ticket in order to increase the chances of institutional balance.
For the KMT, on the other hand, a split ticket could mean disaster.
The ROAD data represent an opportunity for political scientists, geographers, quantitative historians, sociologists, and others to learn about electoral behavior, the political characteristics of local community context, electoral geography, the role minority groups play in elections and legislative redistricting, split ticket voting and divided government, elections under federalism, and numerous other topics of central importance to many disciplines.
The degree of correspondence between the parties varies, but once again the analysis depicts a sizeable level of split ticket voting.
The split ticket would also make the candidates themselves consider their choices more seriously; if a candidate doesn't select his running mate wisely, he runs the risk of riding into the White House shadowed by an unfriendly deputy.
Perhaps the most shocking discovery was a difference of more than PS100 between a direct ticket to Edinburgh from Cardiff Central and a split ticket for the same journey.