split-brain


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split-brain

(splĭt′brān′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or subjected to surgical separation of the hemispheres of the brain by severing the corpus callosum: split-brain operation to prevent epileptic seizures.

split′-brain′



adj.
having, involving, or pertaining to a separation of the cerebral hemispheres by severing the corpus callosum.
[1955–60]
References in periodicals archive ?
In split-brain patients, each side of the brain is individually conscious but mostly separate from the other.
Another observation: A split-brain patient, asked to unbutton his shirt with his left hand, would button it up again with his right hand.
The preparation of the split-brain was especially important in this respect.
Sections address key ideas in cognitive and visual thinking in relation to teaching and learning science, perception and cognition and the design of a split-brain user interface, visualization, and the fourth dimension; knowledge visualization in biology, math, digital media, and music; methods for teaching computing and programming skills using video tutorials and metaphoric visualization; and theoretical and practical materials for teaching and learning science.
A truly software-defined storage solution, Quobyte offers high performance, simplified management of large-scale data repositories and is the first software-only scale-out storage to provide complete fault tolerance and split-brain safety.
In split-brain patients the connecting fiber between the two brain hemispheres is cut.
But there they were, the split-brain results, available for all to see: if the brain's hemisphere's are disconnected, mental states are disconnected.
Although the distinction has widespread applicability in discussions of the structure of consciousness and of pathologies of conscious experience, this paper will illustrate the importance of the distinction primarily using the debate about consciousness in split-brain subjects, suggesting that those who have argued that split-brain subjects have two streams of consciousness apiece and those who have argued that they have a unified consciousness may both be right.
of California-Santa Barbara) describes how several animal and human split-brain studies led him to change his long-term view on mind/brain interactions.
Such split-brain patients were studied by Roger Sperry and Michael Gazzaniga at Caltech in the early 1960s.
The scientist said, "You are seeing the split-brain in action"