split rail

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split rail

n.
A fence rail split lengthwise from a log.

split′-rail′ adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.split rail - a rail that is split from a logsplit rail - a rail that is split from a log  
rail - a horizontal bar (usually of wood or metal)
rail fence - a fence (usually made of split logs laid across each other at an angle)
References in periodicals archive ?
Shepard was found badly beaten and barely breathing, tied to a split-rail fence on a dirt road near Laramie, Wyoming.
That job also yielded a pulley hook, which Jerimiah used to support a light fixture he built from a split-rail fence found in a dumpster.
For example, grapes can be trained up a post, across a wire trellis, over split-rail fencing, even over a pergola or breezeway.
Unlike them, however, the Natchez Trace also has the haunting remains of a plantation mansion, a former town site, nearby Civil War battlefields at Shiloh and Vicksburg, miles of split-rail fencing, and the Nation's second largest Indian mound (earthenworks thought to have been used for burials and religious ceremonies).
Recently, we've been experimenting with a modern twist on the classic split-rail fence that fits many of our goals for a satisfactory fence.
NEW YORK -- Country music superstar Blake Shelton was poised on a mid-Manhattan sidewalk, looking right at home beside a split-rail fence while he toyed with a lariat.
"I sat on a split-rail fence and shouted at the Federals as they marched into town, 'You killed my father!'" At twenty he lost his fight hand in a skirmish with a corn auger.
Although I never dreamed of a life defined solely by having a spouse, children, and a white picket fence, I did wind up with a spouse, children, and a split-rail fence.
Bill was television's first Marlboro Man, though he struck his cowboy pose sitting atop a split-rail fence in the Elliot Unger Elliot Studio on West 54th Street, five thousand martinis east of the lonesome prairie.
Split-rail fences and rustic gates made of natural materials are perfect for such settings.
We stop at log cabins with split-rail fences and walk among the weathered gravestones in cemeteries behind white, clapboard churches.
The popular image of Abe Lincoln as "the old rail-splitter" notwithstanding, split-rail, zigzag fences then widely used in the heavily forested East were prohibitively costly in the West.