split-screen technique


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split-screen technique

n
(Film) a cinematic device by which two or more complete images are projected simultaneously onto separate parts of the screen. Also called: split screen
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Knowing that performance anxiety, one's own insecurities, and fear of failure influence performance in many tasks, I was quite comfortable in using the split-screen technique to help improve this patient's tennis game, as I had done in the past when I helped people improve their concentration for studying and theatrical performances.
Her pioneering split-screen technique is also a clever device and not as irritating as it was when it was first used.
THE split-screen technique used by Lynda La Plane was revolutionary when she first used it in Trial and Retribution, back in 1997.
Director-editor Canosa and lenser Steve Yedlin keep everything moving fluidly, although it's debatable how much the elaborately worked split-screen technique actually adds when all is said and done.
Bellott has employed an ambitious split-screen technique to interconnect the five stories.
Using the split-screen technique, the cameras followed various fast-moving scenes at the same time, adding to the speed of the developing drama.
This is a crackling, fast-paced piece which uses the theatrical equivalent of a split-screen technique to tell its tale.
Using 24's split-screen technique, the tension mounted as Tom put his strides back on and got back on with the job in hand.
split-screen technique is employed, which means you can see the horses only partially with the greyhound commentary over-riding until the dog race has finished.
A modification of the virtual-reality system uses picture-in-picture (PIP) technology, a split-screen technique often used in television to allow viewers to watch more than one program at the same time.
No less startling is the split-screen technique of director Richard Fleischer (who also made 10 Rillington Place).
Likewise, there are frequent, initially disconcerting shifts in point of view, and Stead may even run several settings and actions at the same time in a kind of verbal version of the split-screen technique. In the final chapter, this narrative approach culminates in what must be one of the rarest of bravura performances, wherein the narrator's younger alter ego seduces/is seduced by the soprano wife of a fellow tenant and embarks on a boudoir encounter unequaled in recent New Zealand fiction.