spoils


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spoil

(spoil)
v. spoiled or spoilt (spoilt), spoil·ing, spoils
v. tr.
1.
a. To impair or destroy the quality or value of; ruin: spoiled the dish by adding too much salt.
b. To impair or destroy the enjoyment or experience of: spoiled the movie by talking throughout it.
c. To reveal details about (a movie or a book, for example) before someone has a chance to discover these details on their own: The article spoiled the next episode of my favorite TV show.
2. To harm the character of (a child) by overindulgence or leniency. See Synonyms at pamper.
3. Archaic
a. To plunder; despoil.
b. To take by force.
v. intr.
To become unfit for use or consumption, as from decay. Used especially of perishables, such as food. See Synonyms at decay.
n.
1. spoils
a. Goods or property seized from a victim after a conflict, especially after a military victory.
b. Incidental benefits reaped by a winner, especially political patronage enjoyed by a successful party or candidate.
2. An object of plunder; prey.
3. Refuse material removed from an excavation.
4. Archaic The act of plundering; spoliation.
Phrasal Verb:
spoil for
To be eager for: spoiling for a fight.

[Middle English spoilen, to plunder, from Old French espoillier, from Latin spoliāre, from spolium, booty.]

spoils

(spɔɪlz)
pl n
1. (Military) (sometimes singular) valuables seized by violence, esp in war
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US the rewards and benefits of public office regarded as plunder for the winning party or candidate. See also spoils system

Spoils

 goods acquired by confiscation or seized by force.
Examples: spoils of the city, c. 1300; of the continent, 1774; of time, 1750; of war, 1697.
Translations
فوائِد، غَنائِم، أسْلاب
kořistzisk
byttegevinst
gróîi; herfang, ránsfengur
výhody
arpalıkavanta

spoils

[spɔɪlz] NPLbotín msing
the spoils of warel botín de la guerra

spoils

[ˈspɔɪlz] nplbutin m

spoils

[spɔɪlz] npl the spoilsil bottino msg

spoil

(spoil) past tense, past participles spoiled, ~spoilt (-t) verb
1. to damage or ruin; to make bad or useless. If you touch that drawing you'll spoil it.
2. to give (a child etc) too much of what he wants and possibly make his character, behaviour etc worse by doing so. They spoil that child dreadfully and she's becoming unbearable!
spoils noun plural
profits or rewards. the spoils of war; the spoils of success.
spoilt adjective
He's a very spoilt child!
ˈspoilsport noun
a person who spoils, or refuses to join in, the fun of others.
References in classic literature ?
I frequently returned with the spoils of the woods, and as often presented some of what I had taken to him, expressive of duty to my sovereign.
That spoils my ghostliness, I am afraid, but I don't care--there is something strange about the house--I can feel it.
A suite of gorgeous furniture, whose pronounced and extravagant glories the young girls instinctively hid under home-made linen covers, had also been spoils from afar.
He had for his own town residence a big house filled with the spoils of travel and the trophies of the chase; but it was to his country home, an old family place in Essex, that he wished her immediately to proceed.
I was looking for Harry, please, sir;" and the boy bounded toward her, showing his spoils, which he had gathered in the skirt of his robe.
it won't be Miss who spoils your ease: you'd be the same had she never come.
Saint Antoine wrote his crimes on flaring sheets of paper, seized him--would have torn him out of the breast of an army to bear Foulon company--set his head and heart on pikes, and carried the three spoils of the day, in Wolf-procession through the streets.
Everyone who knows me, spoils me, I believe,' she answered, smiling.
First conquer, then reckon up the spoils, Umslopogaas.
That these ministers, having all employments at their disposal, preserve themselves in power, by bribing the majority of a senate or great council; and at last, by an expedient, called an act of indemnity" (whereof I described the nature to him), "they secure themselves from after-reckonings, and retire from the public laden with the spoils of the nation.
LITTLE Benjamin said, "It spoils people's clothes to squeeze under a gate; the proper way to get in, is to climb down a pear tree.
Opening another book he saw it was "Palmerin de Oliva," and beside it was another called "Palmerin of England," seeing which the licentiate said, "Let the Olive be made firewood of at once and burned until no ashes even are left; and let that Palm of England be kept and preserved as a thing that stands alone, and let such another case be made for it as that which Alexander found among the spoils of Darius and set aside for the safe keeping of the works of the poet Homer.