spoils


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spoil

(spoil)
v. spoiled or spoilt (spoilt), spoil·ing, spoils
v. tr.
1.
a. To impair or destroy the quality or value of; ruin: spoiled the dish by adding too much salt.
b. To impair or destroy the enjoyment or experience of: spoiled the movie by talking throughout it.
c. To reveal details about (a movie or a book, for example) before someone has a chance to discover these details on their own: The article spoiled the next episode of my favorite TV show.
2. To harm the character of (a child) by overindulgence or leniency. See Synonyms at pamper.
3. Archaic
a. To plunder; despoil.
b. To take by force.
v. intr.
To become unfit for use or consumption, as from decay. Used especially of perishables, such as food. See Synonyms at decay.
n.
1. spoils
a. Goods or property seized from a victim after a conflict, especially after a military victory.
b. Incidental benefits reaped by a winner, especially political patronage enjoyed by a successful party or candidate.
2. An object of plunder; prey.
3. Refuse material removed from an excavation.
4. Archaic The act of plundering; spoliation.
Phrasal Verb:
spoil for
To be eager for: spoiling for a fight.

[Middle English spoilen, to plunder, from Old French espoillier, from Latin spoliāre, from spolium, booty.]

spoils

(spɔɪlz)
pl n
1. (Military) (sometimes singular) valuables seized by violence, esp in war
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US the rewards and benefits of public office regarded as plunder for the winning party or candidate. See also spoils system

Spoils

 goods acquired by confiscation or seized by force.
Examples: spoils of the city, c. 1300; of the continent, 1774; of time, 1750; of war, 1697.
Translations
فوائِد، غَنائِم، أسْلاب
kořistzisk
byttegevinst
gróîi; herfang, ránsfengur
výhody
arpalıkavanta

spoils

[spɔɪlz] NPLbotín msing
the spoils of warel botín de la guerra

spoils

[ˈspɔɪlz] nplbutin m

spoils

[spɔɪlz] npl the spoilsil bottino msg

spoil

(spoil) past tense, past participles spoiled, ~spoilt (-t) verb
1. to damage or ruin; to make bad or useless. If you touch that drawing you'll spoil it.
2. to give (a child etc) too much of what he wants and possibly make his character, behaviour etc worse by doing so. They spoil that child dreadfully and she's becoming unbearable!
spoils noun plural
profits or rewards. the spoils of war; the spoils of success.
spoilt adjective
He's a very spoilt child!
ˈspoilsport noun
a person who spoils, or refuses to join in, the fun of others.
References in classic literature ?
If water spoils pumpkins," observed Jack, with a deep sigh, "then my days are numbered.
I've never noticed that water spoils pumpkins," returned Tip; "unless the water happens to be boiling.
The Greeks, after burning the city, sacrifice Polyxena at the tomb of Achilles: Odysseus murders Astyanax; Neoptolemus takes Andromache as his prize, and the remaining spoils are divided.
Fragment #4 -- Scholiast on Euripedes, Troades 31: For the followers of Acamus and Demophon took no share -- it is said -- of the spoils, but only Aethra, for whose sake, indeed, they came to Ilium with Menestheus to lead them.
The spoils were indeed very large; for, notwithstanding that much was consumed, a great deal of plate, rich armour, and splendid clothing, had been secured by the exertions of the dauntless outlaws, who could be appalled by no danger when such rewards were in view.
At this point they came in sight of thirty forty windmills that there are on plain, and as soon as Don Quixote saw them he said to his squire, "Fortune is arranging matters for us better than we could have shaped our desires ourselves, for look there, friend Sancho Panza, where thirty or more monstrous giants present themselves, all of whom I mean to engage in battle and slay, and with whose spoils we shall begin to make our fortunes; for this is righteous warfare, and it is God's good service to sweep so evil a breed from off the face of the earth.
SEVERAL Political Entities were dividing the spoils.
Why, of course, of course - I knew you'd spoil the child.
Why did you spoil your pretty thought by tagging that last sentence on, honey?
You dabbled in nasty mud, and made pies, when you were a child; and you dabble in nasty science, and dissect spiders, and spoil flowers, when you grow up.
The father embraced them both, and bestowing his kisses and affection impartially on each, said, "I wish you both would look into the mirror every day: you, my son, that you may not spoil your beauty by evil conduct; and you, my daughter, that you may make up for your lack of beauty by your virtues.
I often wonder why people are all in league to spoil me.