spoilsman

(redirected from spoilsmen)

spoilsman

(ˈspɔɪlzmən)
n, pl -men
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics US a person who shares in the spoils of office or advocates the spoils system

spoils•man

(ˈspɔɪlz mən)

n., pl. -men.
a person who seeks or receives a share in political spoils.
[1835–45]
Translations

spoilsman

n pl <-men> (US Pol)
(= supporter)Befürworter(in) m(f)der Ämterpatronage
(= profiteer)Profiteur(in) m(f)der Ämterpatronage
References in periodicals archive ?
See William Dudley Foulke, Fighting the Spoilsmen 257 (1919);
If the alternative to elections is that judges will be spoilsmen, then drafters might well prefer to risk that judges will become politicians.
Whatever may be the differences of their members in a vocation or in attainments, when it is a question of the government of the city, by the spoilsmen, for the party, there is nothing to choose between political organizations.
They have been the occasion for the gathering of disgruntled spoilsmen (once again, note some of the 1872 Liberal Republicans).
155) In contrast to the appointed spoilsmen in the territory, Ward praised the "virtue and intelligence" and "enterprise and sturdy vigor" of territorial residents who had "borne the first shock of savage uprisings" and now sought statehood for the "sake of the common weal.
For in criminaloid philosophy it is "un-American" to wrench patronage from the hands of spoilsmen, "un-American" to deal Federal justice to rascals of state eminence, "un-American" to pry into "private arrangements" between shipper and carrier, "un-American" to fry the truth out of reluctant magnates.
became deputies and spoilsmen in the growing system of controls.
Logically, therefore, Perle and Frum want to replace lifelong public servants with presidential spoilsmen.
This will undoubtedly be seized upon by advocates of democratic control and by spoilsmen as an excuse to push the system of political appointment downward rather than the merit system upward.
When Hayes acted on it, the spoilsmen turned on him.
Van Buren's administration continued the consolidation of power in the executive branch because the spoilsmen could best ensure their hold on public office if their tenure depended on the decision of one man rather than on the popular will.