spondee


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spon·dee

 (spŏn′dē′)
n.
A metrical foot consisting of two long or stressed syllables.

[Middle English sponde, from Old French spondee, from Latin spondēum, from neuter of spondēus, of libations, spondaic, from Greek spondeios, from spondē, libation (from its use in songs performed at libations); see spend- in Indo-European roots.]

spondee

(ˈspɒndiː)
n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot consisting of two long syllables (¯¯)
[C14: from Old French spondée, from Latin spondēus, from Greek spondeios, from spondē a ritual libation; from the use of spondee in the music that characteristically accompanied such ceremonies]

spon•dee

(ˈspɒn di)

n.
a foot of two syllables, both of which are long in quantitative meter or stressed in accentual meter.
[1350–1400; Middle English sponde < Latin spondēus < Greek spondeîos, derivative of spondḗ libation (spondees were a feature of hymns sung during libations)]

spondee

a foot of two syllables, both long or stressed. — spondiac, adj.
See also: Verse

spondee

A metrical foot of two syllables, both accented.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spondee - a metrical unit with stressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Translations
kaksipitkäspondee

spondee

[ˈspɒndiː] Nespondeo m

spondee

nSpondeus m
References in classic literature ?
Pain is always by the side of joy, the spondee by the dactyl.--Master, I must relate to you the history of the Barbeau mansion.
The abbe, who was quite innocent of Latin, nodded his head, in cadence, at every roll which La Fontaine impressed upon his body, according to the undulations of the dactyls and spondees. While this was going on, behind the confiture-basins, Fouquet related the event of the day to his son-in-law, M.
Indeed, the poet's daring use of the dash--strengthened by the spondee 'deid dune' --breaks the rhythm of the traditional ballad stanza he uses to open his poem.
(2) Here, spondee compounds like "white-maned" and "gaunt-flanked" help create the compact feel of the poem; no single line has more unstressed syllables than stressed syllables.
Third is the strong sonority of the opening line, which rather than iambic pentameter is better scanned as a spondee, a troche, two dactyls and an extra stressed syllable:
But there's more fun to be had, legal too, in exploiting the capital afforded by the spondee in foot 1, and shooting the rapids of four consecutive slacks mid-line.
This hard-hitting spondee stresses the weight of responsibility on the mother.
Less common, in fact, is Huygens's use here of nemo as a trochee instead of a spondee, though that not without classical precedent (Cf.
The spondee is sonically pleasing--blunt and snub and thudding just when the effect is called for--it makes for a more compact epithet than the literal "god who is master of the sea," or "potent god," and it connotes the nautical in a way that Horace's potenti does not, perhaps to make amends for "seem'st fair." (66)
The Staggered Spondaic Words (SSW) test [15], a measure of dichotic listening, presents 40 pairs of "spondaic" words, each "spondee" consisting of two complete one syllable words (e.g., "cupcake") spoken with equal emphasis on both syllables.
The auditory perception ability of the two groups was evaluated using the spondee test.
Dactyls, feet and spondee are terms used in discussing which art form?