spondee

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Related to spondees: spondaic, dactyl

spon·dee

 (spŏn′dē′)
n.
A metrical foot consisting of two long or stressed syllables.

[Middle English sponde, from Old French spondee, from Latin spondēum, from neuter of spondēus, of libations, spondaic, from Greek spondeios, from spondē, libation (from its use in songs performed at libations); see spend- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spondee

(ˈspɒndiː)
n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot consisting of two long syllables (¯¯)
[C14: from Old French spondée, from Latin spondēus, from Greek spondeios, from spondē a ritual libation; from the use of spondee in the music that characteristically accompanied such ceremonies]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spon•dee

(ˈspɒn di)

n.
a foot of two syllables, both of which are long in quantitative meter or stressed in accentual meter.
[1350–1400; Middle English sponde < Latin spondēus < Greek spondeîos, derivative of spondḗ libation (spondees were a feature of hymns sung during libations)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

spondee

a foot of two syllables, both long or stressed. — spondiac, adj.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

spondee

A metrical foot of two syllables, both accented.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spondee - a metrical unit with stressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kaksipitkäspondee

spondee

[ˈspɒndiː] Nespondeo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

spondee

nSpondeus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The abbe, who was quite innocent of Latin, nodded his head, in cadence, at every roll which La Fontaine impressed upon his body, according to the undulations of the dactyls and spondees. While this was going on, behind the confiture-basins, Fouquet related the event of the day to his son-in-law, M.
Pain is always by the side of joy, the spondee by the dactyl.--Master, I must relate to you the history of the Barbeau mansion.
Written in blank verse and mostly in iambic pentameter, though frequently flourished with spondees and trochees, the poem acknowledges the passage of time with more than a touch of sadness, tempered, however, with appreciation.
However, Cupid, the protagonist and anti-hero, steals one foot from every second line of Ovid's epic, turning it into an elegiac couplet with six rhythmical units (spondees and dactyls) and one pentameter with a caesura for a strong rhythmical break.
The other part of Zimmer's success, though, comes from metrical lessons he learned from his two alliterative "masters." Even though he stopped producing poetry, Zimmer's prose nonetheless incorporates such techniques as alliteration, poetic compounds, paratactic compression, the clearing of "extraneous" grammatical matter, and metrical patterns that include a high proportion of spondees and trochees (in imitation of Old English A-type verses).
hurriedly, sometimes (as in the spondees of "[he] rebuffed the big
Audiometric configuration and prediction of threshold for spondees. J Speech Hear Res.
6 and 14), and some significant spondees or molossuses (l.
The poem, selected according to the commentator "because of Morriseau-Leroy's exploration of colonial legacies, neocolonial or postcolonial challenges, and general commitment to issues of social justice" grapples with issues of implied address, considerably more flexible pronouns than English, and a Creole-language meter that begins in iamb and devolves into "a heterogeneous (and wild) company of anapests, trochees, iambs, and spondees." Even the first three lines of the brief, nine-line poem illustrate that translation is far more complex an art than a simple mathematical process of replacing each word in Creole with its counterpart in English; the trot provided, while fascinating, is clearly lacking as a poem in English.
As the ego of the speaker rises, challenging accepted belief, so too, metrically, the lines of the second stanza have more tension, such as spondees for emphasis, as when the speaker describes the child's gaze "Fixed full, and steady." Her "childish honesty" is the next step for this "qualified" speaker as she looks closely and directly at accepted wisdom, questioning what she has been taught.
Effects of alcohol on speech: Acoustic analysis of spondees. Research on Speech Perception, 16, 263-291.
Even when I was a boy at school a lot of time was spent studying dactyls, spondees iambs, meter, scansion, caesura and enjambement in more language than English.