spoofery


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to spoofery: spoofy

spoofery

(ˈspuːfərɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) mildly satirical mockery or parody
References in periodicals archive ?
For all the cheerful humor mined from internet spoofery in "Ralph Breaks the Internet," there is one scene not long before the climax that rings as purely poignant -- a moment of innocence lost.
A follow-up to 2014's The Stick of Truth, this RPG based on the anarchic adult animation series swaps out its predecessor's swords-and-sorcery-focused Lord of the Rings spoofery for a superhero-themed adventure.
Quite what playwright Anne Washburn is trying to say in this piece remains a mystery; all the laughs come from the writing of Matt Groening, the songs descend into Rocky Horror-style pastiche, and the seriousness of the first act dissipates into spoofery.
That bit of spoofery is perhaps deserved because of the pageant subculture.
An ambitious Brit indie that doesn't quite meet the expectations it raises, "Eliminate: Archie Cookson" starts as a droll sad-sack spin on spy spoofery, but by the end has shifted from comedy toward a dramatic heft its spindly legs can't support.
IMAGINE The Lord of the Rings with lots of bad-taste, jokes, clunkier creatures and clumsier battle scenes and you're halfway towards getting the measure of Your Highness - an outrageous medieval fantasy romp with less sorcery and a lot more spoofery.
"Death Comes to Town" stays true to the troupe's skill at capturing the weirdness in human behavior and social habits, while wasting little time on pop-culture spoofery. But unlike their sketch-comedy series, this is a handsomely cinematic enterprise, with a robust serialized narrative and a big whodunit finish that befits Agatha Christie.
"They are using a combination of flattery, trickery and spoofery to induce people into signing up.
and writer-directors Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer follow up the spoofery of Scary Movie, Date Movie and Epic Movie with the self-explanatory DISASTER MOVIE.
More spoofery is in the works with the Sarasota Ballet's one-time only rendition of The Nutty Nutcracker.
Mark Strand's "Chekhov: A Sestina" demonstrates that prose can accommodate the intricacies of that verse form, just as "Woods" in Emerson's journals can serve as a "prose sonnet." The appearance of such a poem as Tom Whalen's "Why I Hate Prose Poems" indicates that the prose poem has, for all the talk of its "subversive" nature, itself become a self-conscious genre inviting spoofery.