spotted gum


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spotted gum

n
1. (Plants) an Australian eucalyptus tree, Eucalyptus maculata
2. (Forestry) the wood of this tree, used for shipbuilding, sleepers, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spotted gum - large gum tree with mottled barkspotted gum - large gum tree with mottled bark  
eucalypt, eucalyptus tree, eucalyptus - a tree of the genus Eucalyptus
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, the new terminal includes a village-type green, which can be used for laying and playing on, outdoor furniture, bench seating and the use of local materials, including spotted gum wood and local Queensland stone.
sideroxylon (Red Ironbark), Corymbia maculata (Spotted Gum) and E.
Caption: Each pipe features leather upholstered banquette seating, recycled spotted gum slat paneling and acoustic absorption mats.
The native hardwood plantation species used to develop the production part of the model are the frost tolerant western white gum (Eucalyptus argophloia) for lower lying areas and spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subs.
Spotted gum, a type of eucalyptus, runs throughout the house.
Boral Timber of Australia takes extra care and pride in its environmentally friendly way of producing flooring from Australian beech, jarrah, Tasmanian oak, spotted gum and six other types of Down Under wood.
Researchers are making use of such information in developing strategies for planting spotted gum (Eucalyptus maculata) in the Murray-Darling Basin.
7 The undercroft structure is ironbark, the superstructure yellow stringybark, and the floors spotted gum (all eucalyptus).
According to the Encyclopedia of Wood, Tasmanian oak is the export name for three eucalyptus trees known locally as ash (jarrah, karri, spotted gum), but having no connection with European oak or ash.
In southeast Queensland (SEQ) the main hardwood species promoted by government agencies is spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subspecies variegata) which is also the most favoured species for plantation (Huth et al., 2004) accounting for >60 percent of native hardwood volume harvested in Queensland (DPIF, 2004a).