spraddled

spraddled

(ˈsprædəld)
adj
affected by spraddle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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I shot a massive 19-year-old female and later saw the single biggest boar I've ever laid eyes on: a milk-chocolate bear that sat on his haunches, rear legs spraddled, and watched as my guide and I ate our lunches.
a simple crinoline of scallops" bought by Madame Aubert's mother in 1850 ("She should have been painted in it," muses Spratling when shown the dress) (Spratling 418); in Emily's case, it is the white dress she wears in the imaginary tableau in which the town visualizes her, her domineering father "a spraddled silhouette in the foreground" (Faulkner, "Emily" 123).
The punch of Silent Spring has spraddled out to cover a multitude of toxins and settings, and none of them a worse threat to some of our best birdsong than the hamburger industry's grinding up of subtropical forests.
At worst, the spectacle of our esteemed councilors spraddled athwart sagging ovine spines as rambunctious rams cut capers might just provide some entertaining television news footage to amuse the beleaguered taxpayers.
It was uncomfortable and his legs were spraddled and his body was very sore.
I think the answer, which is no answer, is that Cervantes reached down into some ineffable depth of comedy to portray with mock-epic yet also epic grandeur horse and rider caught up by the turning sail and flung through the air with spraddled limbs to the ground far below.
Still walking, we passed the other three old dogs in the middle of the glade, laying down, too; and still that hundred yards ahead of them, Eagle, too, not laying down, because he was still on his feet, but his legs was spraddled and his head was down; maybe jest waiting until we was out of sight of his shame, his eyes saying plain as talk when we passed, "I'm sorry, boys, but this here is all."
Similarly, the narrator of "A Rose for Emily" underscores the intense scrutiny by the town under which Emily falls and by implication the reader as well by suggesting that Emily lies trapped in the collective gaze like a fly in amber: "We had long thought of them as a tableau, Miss Emily's slender figure in white in the background, her father a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the two of them framed by the back-flung front door."(8) And we watch along with the cook Elnora in "There Was a Queen," as she scornfully meditates on the comings and goings of Narcissa Benbow Sartoris, desperate to retrieve stolen obscene letters now in the possession of a Federal agent.